Saints most memorable games

FIVE FABULOUS WINS

1. Feb. 7, 2010, Indianapolis, Sun Life Stadium-Miami, 31-17

Saints cap historic 16-3 season by rallying from a 10-0 deficit to defeat the Colts in Super Bowl XLIV and claim the franchise’s first NFL title. Drew Brees is MVP after Tracy Porter clinches win with interception and TD return.

2. Sept. 25, 2006, Atlanta, Superdome, 23-3

In what might be the most emotional night in New Orleans sports history, the Saints re-open the Superdome after Hurricane Katrina as Steve Gleason sparks the win with a blocked punt that is recovered for a touchdown.

3. Jan. 24, 2010, Minnesota, Superdome, 31-28, OT

Saints win first NFC title on Garrett Hartley’s 40-yard field goal in overtime. Tracy Porter sends the game into OT with an interception of Brett Favre to thwart a field-goal attempt in the waning seconds of regulation.

4. Dec. 30, 2000, St. Louis, Superdome, 31-28

Saints hang on to win first playoff game in franchise history, snuffing out the Rams’ comeback hopes from a 28-7 hole on Brian Milne’s recovery of a muffed punt by wide receiver Az-Zahir Hakim with 1:43 remaining.

5. Nov. 8, 1970, Detroit, Tulane Stadium, 19-17

In their first game under coach J.D. Roberts, Tom Dempsey pulled off the improbable as he kicked an NFL-record 63-yard field goal as time expired to beat the Lions in an otherwise forgettable 2-11-1 season.

HONORABLE MENTION

n Saints 20, Pittsburgh 16 (Nov. 29, 1987, Three Rivers Stadium)

Saints clinch first winning season in 21st year of franchise’s
existence.

Saints 44, Tampa Bay 34 (Dec. 6, 1987, Superdome)

Jim Mora’s team clinches club’s first playoff berth with four games left.

Saints 21, New York Jets 20 (Dec. 14, 1980, Shea Stadium)

Saints notch first win of the season in the snow after 14 straight
losses.

Saints 41, Cincinnati 24 (Dec. 20, 1987, Riverfront Stadium)

Playoff-bound Saints rally from 24-3 deficit, largest in franchise
history.

Saints 46, Miami 34 (Oct. 25, 2009, Landshark Stadium-Miami)

Saints come back from 24-3 second-quarter deficit to run record to 6-0.

FIVE LINGERING LOSSES

1. Oct. 25, 1987, San Francisco, Superdome, 24-22

Game was the first played after the players’ strike and featured coach Jim Mora’s infamous postgame meltown — “Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda.” The bitter loss triggered a nine-game winning streak to end the season.

2. Jan. 21, 2007, Chicago, Soldier Field, 39-14

The Saints’ hopes of playing in their first Super Bowl under first-year coach Sean Payton, who led team to a 10-6 regular-season record, were dashed by Da Bears in NFC Championship game on a cold,
wintry day.

3. Dec. 18, 1983, L.A. Rams, Superdome, 26-24

Mike Lansford’s 42-yard field goal with two seconds left clinched a playoff berth for the Rams and prevented the Saints from reaching the postseason for the first time in club history — silencing a raucous Superdome.

4. Dec. 7, 1980, San Francisco, Candlestick Park, 38-35, OT

In what turned out to be Joe Montana’s coming-out party, the 49ers rallied from a 35-7 halftime deficit to win in overtime and keep the Saints winless at 0-14 in their second game under interim coach Dick Stanfel.

5. Jan. 3, 1993, Philadelphia, Superdome, 36-20

The Eagles rallied from a 20-7 deficit with 29 unanswered points — 26 coming in the decisive fourth quarter — to prevent the Saints from winning their first playoff game in franchise history.

HONORABLE MENTION

n San Francisco 36, Saints 32 (Jan. 14, 2012, Candlestick Park)

49ers’ score winning TD with nine seconds left in divisional playoffs.

Oakland 42, Saints 35 (Dec. 3, 1979, Superdome)

Saints squander a 35-14 second-quarter lead on Monday Night
Football.

Atlanta 20, Saints 17 (Nov. 12, 1978, Superdome)

Falcons win on desperation 57-yard “Big Ben” TD pass as time
expires.

Atlanta 20, Saints 17 (Nov. 26, 1978, Fulton County Stadium)

Falcons prevail on last play after controversial interference call in end zone.

Tampa Bay 33, Saints 14 (Dec. 11, 1977, Superdome)

Expansion Bucs get first win in franchise history after 26 straight losses.

Compiled by Brian Allee-Walsh