Dworaczyk out

LSU offensive guard Josh Dworaczyk (68) and LSU center T-Bob Hebert (53) celebrates with LSU running back Stevan Ridley (34) who just scored the touchdown during the first half Saturday, Nov. 20, 2010, at Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge. Show caption
LSU offensive guard Josh Dworaczyk (68) and LSU center T-Bob Hebert (53) celebrates with LSU running back Stevan Ridley (34) who just scored the touchdown during the first half Saturday, Nov. 20, 2010, at Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge.

LSU loses most experienced offensive lineman

The hits just keep on coming for the LSU offense - and not in a good way.

Coach Les Miles said Monday that senior offensive guard Josh Dworaczyk, the Tigers’ most experienced offensive lineman, will miss significant playing time for an injury that will require surgery within the next two weeks.

Miles did not specify the type of injury, but it is believed to be a knee.

“I think Josh will be out for some time,” Miles said at his first weekly news conference of the new season.

Dworaczyk (6-foot-6, 301 pounds) has 26 career starts at left guard. LSU’s next most-experienced veteran is center P.J. Lonergan (15 starts).

Dworaczyk is the third projected offensive starter to be declared out for Saturday’s season opener between the No. 4-ranked Tigers and No. 3 Oregon in Arlington, Texas (7 p.m., ABC).

Last week, quarterback Jordan Jefferson was suspended and wide receiver Russell Shepard was declared ineligible by the school, Jefferson following his arrest on second-degree battery charges, Shepard for violating an NCAA regulation concerning an NCAA investigation.

LSU did not release a depth chart Monday, but Miles spoke about splitting guard duties between seniors T-Bob Hebert, Will Blackwell and true freshman La’El Collins from Redemptorist. Hebert also backs up Lonergan at center.

“He’s definitely going to get some snaps,” Blackwell said of Collins. “He’s worked really hard and will be very good in the future.”

Blackwell, who missed most of last season with a devastating leg injury, is roommates with Dworaczyk.

“He’s one of my best friends,” Blackwell said. “I try to keep him from thinking about it (the injury) all the time.”

Boone or Beckham?

With Shepard sidelined an undetermined number of games while LSU launches his NCAA reinstatement process, the Tigers are in the market for a starting wide receiver opposite junior Rueben Randle.

Sophomore Kadron Boone said he and true freshman Odell Beckham Jr. are splitting time at Shepard’s spot right now.

Boone also said freshman Jarvis Landry is working at the slot receiver position. Landry was one of the LSU players questioned about the Aug. 19 bar fight that led to Jefferson’s arrest, but Miles reiterated Monday that Landry’s playing status is OK for the Oregon game.

“We all bring something different to the table,” Boone said.

“I’m excited. It’s a great opportunity. Everyone is going to be keying on Rueben, so we have to show what we can do.”

Cuban calling

Outspoken Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban will be a guest picker during ESPN’s “College Game Day” show, which will be broadcast live Saturday from Cowboys Stadium in the hours leading up to the LSU-Oregon Game.

This is Cuban’s second time on the program. The owner of the NBA champion Mavs also joined the show before the 2009 Texas-Oklahoma game.

Meanwhile, fans can visit www.youtube.com to see the “College Game Day” commercial Miles shot earlier this summer in which he instructs the Game Day crew on the nuances of grass chewing.

LSU-Oregon series

This will be just the fourth meeting between the Tigers and Ducks in football, and their first outside Tiger Stadium.

Oregon visited Baton Rouge for a pair of games the 1930s, winning 12-0 in 1932 and losing to the Tigers 14-13 in 1934.

In 1977, LSU rolled up a school record 503 yards rushing in a 56-17 rout of the Ducks, 237 of those yards by Charles Alexander.

The last word

“The body of work has been done here and has not changed over time. I think people will understand that this is a very quality team.”

Miles on whether the

  • ational perception of LSU has changed because of its recent off-the-field issues