Vick takes pay cut for chance to start

Advocate staff photo by PATRICK DENNISEagles quarterback Michael Vick barks signals to his teammates during a Nov. 5 game against the Saints in New Orleans. Show caption
Advocate staff photo by PATRICK DENNISEagles quarterback Michael Vick barks signals to his teammates during a Nov. 5 game against the Saints in New Orleans.

PHILADELPHIA — Michael Vick took a significant pay cut to stay with the Philadelphia Eagles and compete for a starting job.

The four-time Pro Bowl quarterback agreed Monday to a restructured three-year contract with the Eagles, just two seasons after signing a $100 million extension that included $35.5 million in guaranteed money. The new deal is essentially for one year, however.

A source familiar with the contract said Vick could earn up to $10 million in 2013 if he meets all his performance incentives, and the team will void the remaining two years on March 15. That person spoke on condition of anonymity because the terms haven’t been released.

Vick was slated to earn about $16 million next season, including a $3 million roster bonus. He lost his starting job to rookie Nick Foles last season, but new coach Chip Kelly will give him a chance to win it back.

Vick had a breakout year in 2010, leading the Eagles to the NFC East title, winning The Associated Press Comeback Player of the Year award and starting in the Pro Bowl. But he’s battled injuries and inconsistency the last two years.

“What I look at is skillset first and foremost,” Kelly said. “What he can do, how he can throw the football, how he can beat people with his feet. There are a lot of different factors he has. And you have to look at the landscape for other quarterbacks. I guess the best way I can put this is I agree there is a change of scenery going on here. For Michael Vick, there is a change of scenery, but not a change of address.”

Dolphins

STADIUM DEAL COULD HINGE ON SUPER BOWL GUARANTEE: In Miami, even if voters approve using tax money to help upgrade the Dolphins’ stadium, a deal might be contingent on the NFL awarding the 2016 Super Bowl to the city.

The Dolphins confirmed Monday they’ve reversed their position and agreed to a referendum. A no vote would scuttle the plan.

Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez said that should the measure pass, county commissioners still ought to have final approval — and insist on assurances from the NFL that the city will host the 50th Super Bowl in 2016.

The Dolphins hope the referendum can be held before May 22, when league owners are expected to choose the host for the milestone Super Bowl. Miami and San Francisco are the finalists.

Bills

TEAM CUTS VETERANS BARNETT, WILSON: In Buffalo, N.Y., the Bills started to reshape their defense under new coach Doug Marrone by releasing two veterans Monday: linebacker Nick Barnett and safety George Wilson.

General Manager Buddy Nix said the cuts were made with the intention of moving the team forward and freeing up spots to allow Buffalo’s younger players to step into those roles.