Higher education briefs for Dec. 3, 2012

Photo provided by Cheryl GerberTulane University students Susan Lanigan, left, and Brendan Bowen, act out a scene from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet at John Dibert Community School. Show caption
Photo provided by Cheryl GerberTulane University students Susan Lanigan, left, and Brendan Bowen, act out a scene from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet at John Dibert Community School.

NASA speaker set
for UNO graduation

New Orleans — Patrick Scheuermann, a University of New Orleans alumnus and director of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as UNO’s fall 2012 commencement speaker Dec. 15 at 3 p.m. at the UNO Lakefront Arena.

Scheuermann was named director of the Marshall Center in September. He previously served as director of the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss. A New Orleans native, he earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from UNO.

Tulane introduces Shakespeare to kids

New Orleans — Tulane University theater students in the Shakespeare on the Road service-learning course introduced students at three schools to the themes of revenge, discrimination and relationships in the bard’s work — and to some swordplay, too.

Six students recently performed scenes from “Hamlet,” “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” and “Romeo and Juliet” at John Dibert Community School. Earlier performances this semester were at Audubon Charter School and McWilliams Hall on the uptown campus.

The actors grabbed the attention of their middle-school audience with a sword fight, a kiss during “Romeo and Juliet” and a scene from the tragedy of “Titus Andronicus,” in which Titus reveals to his dinner guests that he’s baked their family members into the pies they’ve already begun eating.

“One of my goals is to make it [Shakespeare] relevant and that’s why we aren’t showing up in tights,” said Chaney Tullos, an adjunct lecturer in the Tulane University Department of Theatre and Dance who teaches the course. “It’s really a two-way street. The Tulane students are learning just as much the young students do.”

Entremont set to perform at Loyola

New Orleans — Philippe Entremont, former director of the New Orleans Philharmonic Orchestra, will perform Beethoven’s “Triple Concerto” at Loyola University New Orleans at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Louis J. Roussel Performance Hall.

The performance is part of the ongoing centennial celebration at Loyola.

With Entremont at the piano, the performance will also feature the Loyola Symphony Orchestra, with Loyola faculty members Amy Thiaville on violin and Allen Nisbet on cello. Both Nisbet and Thiaville played under Entremont’s direction while members of the New Orleans Philharmonic Orchestra.

Tickets are $40 for preferred seating, $25 for reserved seating, and $15 for Loyola students, faculty and staff. For tickets and information, visit http://montage.loyno.edu or call (504) 865-2074.

Free parking is available in the West Road Garage, accessible from St. Charles Avenue.

LSUHSC dentists
ID missing worker

New Orleans — A team of forensic dentists at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Dentistry identified the body of an offshore oil platform worker found in the Gulf of Mexico last week.

Ronald Carr and Robert Barsley used dental records from the Philippines to identify Jerome Malagapo, who had been missing since the Nov. 16 explosion on an oil platform operated by Black Elk Energy Offshore Operations, LLC.

Carr is clinical professor of Pathology and Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, and Barsley is professor and head of the Division of Diagnostic Sciences in the Department of Comprehensive Dentistry and Biomaterials, and director of Oral Health Resources, Community & Hospital Dentistry at LSUHSC New Orleans School of Dentistry.

The two worked with Lafourche Parish Coroner Dr. John King on this case. LSUHSC New Orleans forensic dentists have worked with coroners’ offices in a number of jurisdictions in the region, law enforcement, and the FACES Lab at LSU for many years.

LSUHSC registry wins quality honor

New Orleans — The Louisiana Tumor Registry at the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Public Health was awarded a 2012 Data Quality Profile First Place Award by a National Institutes of Health program.

The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program of the NIH’s National Cancer Institute bestowed the award.

The LSUHSC Louisiana Tumor Registry is the only SEER expansion registry to receive a first place award.

This is the fourth time LSUHSC’s Louisiana Tumor Registry has earned this award, and the third consecutive year.

The primary function of a cancer registry is to record the occurrence of cancer in a population. Information collected includes demographics, tumor characteristics, stage of disease at diagnosis, treatment and survival.

Researcher returns to Tulane staff

Mead Allison, one of the nation’s leading experts on land-creating sediment in the Mississippi River and Louisiana’s continental shelf, will join Tulane University as a professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences next fall.

Allison’s appointment is part of Tulane’s focus on the river and coast and will strengthen the university’s partnership with The Water Institute of the Gulf, a not-for-profit research institute where Allison will become director of physical processes and sediment systems.

Allison will facilitate interaction between his field-based studies and Tulane faculty who study a wide range of Earth surface processes using theory, experiments and a variety of geochemical techniques.

Allison will lead researchers in understanding the ways in which coastal environments are affected by coastal erosion, flooding, sea-level rise and subsidence. His initial focus will be on the availability, amount, and characteristics of river and coastal sediments and the best methods to use this limited resource for restoration and protection efforts.

Allison was a faculty member in Tulane’s Earth and Environmental Sciences Department from 1999 to 2007 and currently serves as associate director of the Jackson School of Geosciences’ Institute for Geophysics at the University of Texas at Austin.

Delgado sets small business program

New Orleans — The deadline to apply to the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program at Delgado Community College is Monday.

The program is an initiative to unlock the growth and job-creation potential of 10,000 small businesses across the United States through greater access to business education, financial capital and business support services.

The next class begins in March. To apply or for more information, visit http://www.dcc.edu/10ksb or call (504) 671-5555.

The program has had more than 130 participants since it was launched in New Orleans. The program’s local partners include Hope Enterprise Corporation, the Urban League of Greater New Orleans and the Louisiana Small Business Development Center.

Professor receives national honor

New Orleans — The Child Neurology Society presented Ann Henderson Tilton of LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans with the 2012 Hower Award.

The award, presented at the 41st Annual CNS Meeting last month, is given to one child neurologist each year.

It honors an outstanding teacher and scholar whose contributions to the specialty have been recognized at national and international levels.

Tilton is a professor of Neurology and Pediatrics and section chair of Child Neurology at LSUHSC in New Orleans. She is the codirector of the Rehabilitation Center at Children’s Hospital of New Orleans and director of the Comprehensive Spasticity Program.