Holden’s youth video takes on healthy habits

Mayor-President Kip Holden and a group of local teens went old school for a new music video taking on childhood and youth obesity, using an early ’90s hip-hop theme to promote healthy living.

The music video stars the members of the Mayor’s Youth Advisory Council, who wrote and performed the song. The song, called “5-2-1-0+10,” encourages teens to have a daily regimen of five servings of fruits and vegetables, two hours or less of TV or computer time, at least 1 hour of physical exercise, zero sugary drinks and 10 hours of sleep.

The video, which features the teens dancing and riding bikes with Holden, was unveiled Tuesday as the capstone project for the members of the youth council who recently graduated high school and are heading off to college.

Austin Wendt, 19, said the experience has been rewarding and educational for him.

“It’s a really exciting time for Baton Rouge, we’re a growing city, we have a lot of big businesses coming in and with the movie industry,” said Wendt, who is president of the youth council. “I wanted to be involved in that.”

The teens received a grant from State Farm for more than $70,000 to produce the video and promote it. Wendt said the teens chose the topic of promoting healthy living and then wrote the lyrics together.

They collaborated with John Gray, a local musician and the Dunham High School music teacher.

At the release party, Holden took selfies with the teens, who referred to him as “Kip,” dropping the formality of his mayoral title.

Holden joked about his bad dance moves featured in the video, but said working with the teens was one of the most rewarding parts of his job.

“When I was out there, I was not just Kip Holden the adult, or Kip Holden the mayor; we would just go out there and have fun,” he said. “This shows the amount of talent we have in Baton Rouge but it also shows we can do more for other schools as well as other cities.”

The music video will periodically play during the previews at AMC theatres in Baton Rouge beginning Labor Day until New Year’s.