Health-care software firm to hire 52 in BR

LocalMed, a health-care software company that got its start earlier this year in the LSU Student Incubator at the Louisiana Business & Technology Center, announced it will hire 52 employees by 2016.

The company develops software that allows patients to schedule appointments through their computer, smartphone or tablet at any time with participating doctors and dentists. Reminders of upcoming appointments are sent to patients. LocalMed is set to launch in early 2013. iTunes and Android apps will be available.

Louisiana Economic Development Secretary Stephen Moret said LocalMed employees will have an average salary of $52,000, plus benefits. The company considered setting up its headquarters in Texas or Florida, but chose a location on Sherwood Forest Boulevard. LocalMed is also expected to create 53 indirect jobs.

Keith English, chief executive officer of LocalMed, said the plan is to offer the service in 32 states by the end of 2014. English said the company is lining up doctors and dentists to participate in the software. English said he couldn’t yet disclose the names of any participants, but said they would be names familiar to Baton Rouge residents.

“We want to build LocalMed in Louisiana,” English said.

He joined the company as CEO in May after purchasing an investment stake. English started several successful Web-based companies, including LeadRev, which provided online leads to microlenders, auto finance companies and others in the speciality financial marketplace.

LocalMed has 12 employees and plans to hire another 10 to 15 workers by the end of 2013. The company plans to use several LED programs, including FastStart job-training, the Digital Interactive Media and Software Development Incentive and Quality Jobs.

LocalMed was founded in early 2012 by Daniel and Derek Gilbert, twin brothers who got the idea for the business while Daniel was battling cancer and juggling up to eight doctors’ appointments at a time.

The company won $3,500 in seed capital earlier this year at the 2012 Venture Challenge, the signature event of the LSU Student Incubator.

Charles D’Agostino, executive director of the LBTC, said the student incubator was founded in 2010 to reverse the “brain drain” of recent LSU graduates leaving Louisiana and settling in other states.

“In this case, not only are we not losing anyone, but we’re seeing jobs multiply,” he said.

William L. Jenkins, interim LSU System president and chancellor, said the student incubator is providing opportunities to bright young men and women.

“It’s a source of enormous pride and satisfaction to me,” he said.