Photos: Preservationists work to restore Bolden childhood home

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  • Advocate staff photo by MATTHEW HINTON -- United Kingdom resident Anne Thorpe, center, poses for a picture on the stoop of Charles 'Buddy' Bolden's house on First Street in Central City during a jazz history tour with Diplomat Travel Southern Sounds Music Tour, while Peter and Ann Brown ready their camera to take pictures on the stoop in New Orleans, La. Thursday, April 10, 2014. The building has been boarded up and has many signs of disrepair. Legend has it that the stoop is where Jazz music began when Bolden was kicked out of the house for playing too loud with his cornet, similar to a trumpet, and was heard playing on the stoop by clarinetist and Boldens neighbor Michael Lewis. Lewis and Bolden later formed a band in the 1890s where for the first time wind instruments like the cornet were the main instruments and were used to play blues music fused with ragtime and gospel while string instruments were used as the supporting rhythm section. In 1907, Bolden was diagnosed with premature dementia or schizophrenia only a few years after forming the band and spent the rest of his life in a mental institution. Because of the unfortunate diagnosis, Bolden was not recognized till later as being an important international music figure with some historians considering him 'The Father of Jazz.' Cornet jazz pioneer Joe 'King' Oliver, who mentored Louis Armstrong, credited Bolden as an early influence.

  • Advocate staff photo by MATTHEW HINTON -- Charles 'Buddy' Bolden's home has been boarded up and shows signs of disrepair in New Orleans, La. Thursday, April 10, 2014. Legend has it that the stoop of the home is where Jazz music began when Bolden was kicked out of the house for playing too loud with his cornet, similar to a trumpet, and was heard playing on the stoop by clarinetist and Boldens neighbor Michael Lewis. Lewis and Bolden later formed a band in the 1890s where for the first time wind instruments like the cornet were the main instruments and were used to play blues music fused with ragtime and gospel while string instruments were used as the supporting rhythm section. In 1907, Bolden was diagnosed with premature dementia or schizophrenia only a few years after forming the band and spent the rest of his life in a mental institution. Because of the unfortunate diagnosis, Bolden was not recognized till later as being an important international music figure with some historians considering him 'The Father of Jazz.' Cornet jazz pioneer Joe "King" Oliver, who mentored Louis Armstrong, credited Bolden as an early influence.

  • Advocate staff photo by MATTHEW HINTON -- United Kingdom resident Anne Thorpe, left, takes a picture of husband John Thorpe on the stoop of Charles 'Buddy' Bolden's house on First Street in Central City during a jazz history tour with Diplomat Travel Southern Sounds Music Tour in New Orleans, La. Thursday, April 10, 2014. The building has been boarded up and has many signs of disrepair. Legend has it that the stoop is where Jazz music began when Bolden was kicked out of the house for playing too loud with his cornet, similar to a trumpet, and was heard playing on the stoop by clarinetist and Boldens neighbor Michael Lewis. Lewis and Bolden later formed a band in the 1890s where for the first time wind instruments like the cornet were the main instruments and were used to play blues music fused with ragtime and gospel while string instruments were used as the supporting rhythm section. In 1907, Bolden was diagnosed with premature dementia or schizophrenia only a few years after forming the band and spent the rest of his life in a mental institution. Because of the unfortunate diagnosis, Bolden was not recognized till later as being an important international music figure with some historians considering him 'The Father of Jazz' Cornet jazz pioneer Joe 'King' Oliver, who mentored Louis Armstrong, credited Bolden as an early influence.

  • Advocate staff photo by MATTHEW HINTON -- United Kingdom residents John Perkins takes a picture of wife Joan Perkins on the stoop of Charles 'Buddy' Bolden's house on First Street in Central City during a jazz history tour with Diplomat Travel Southern Sounds Music Tour in New Orleans, La. Thursday, April 10, 2014. The building has been boarded up and has many signs of disrepair. Legend has it that the stoop is where Jazz music began when Bolden was kicked out of the house for playing too loud with his cornet, similar to a trumpet, and was heard playing on the stoop by clarinetist and Boldens neighbor Michael Lewis. Lewis and Bolden later formed a band in the 1890s where for the first time wind instruments like the cornet were the main instruments and were used to play blues music fused with ragtime and gospel while string instruments were used as the supporting rhythm section. In 1907, Bolden was diagnosed with premature dementia or schizophrenia only a few years after forming the band and spent the rest of his life in a mental institution. Because of the unfortunate diagnosis, Bolden was not recognized till later as being an important international music figure with some historians considering him 'The Father of Jazz.' Cornet jazz pioneer Joe 'King' Oliver, who mentored Louis Armstrong, credited Bolden as an early influence.

  • Advocate staff photo by MATTHEW HINTON -- United Kingdom residents gather in front of Charles 'Buddy' Bolden's house on First Street in Central City during a jazz history tour with Diplomat Travel Southern Sounds Music Tour in New Orleans, La. Thursday, April 10, 2014. The building has been boarded up and has many signs of disrepair. Legend has it that the stoop is where Jazz music began when Bolden was kicked out of the house for playing too loud with his cornet, similar to a trumpet, and was heard playing on the stoop by clarinetist and Boldens neighbor Michael Lewis. Lewis and Bolden later formed a band in the 1890s where for the first time wind instruments like the cornet were the main instruments and were used to play blues music fused with ragtime and gospel while string instruments were used as the supporting rhythm section. In 1907, Bolden was diagnosed with premature dementia or schizophrenia only a few years after forming the band and spent the rest of his life in a mental institution. Because of the unfortunate diagnosis, Bolden was not recognized till later as being an important international music figure with some historians considering him 'The Father of Jazz' Cornet jazz pioneer Joe 'King' Oliver, who mentored Louis Armstrong, credited Bolden as an early influence.

  • Advocate staff photo by MATTHEW HINTON -- Chris Stotesbury, of the United Kingdom, takes a picture of tourists in front of Charles 'Buddy' Bolden's house on First Street in Central City during a jazz history tour with Diplomat Travel Southern Sounds Music Tour in New Orleans, La. Thursday, April 10, 2014. The building has been boarded up and has many signs of disrepair. Legend has it that the stoop is where Jazz music began when Bolden was kicked out of the house for playing too loud with his cornet, similar to a trumpet, and was heard playing on the stoop by clarinetist and Boldens neighbor Michael Lewis. Lewis and Bolden later formed a band in the 1890s where for the first time wind instruments like the cornet were the main instruments and were used to play blues music fused with ragtime and gospel while string instruments were used as the supporting rhythm section. In 1907, Bolden was diagnosed with premature dementia or schizophrenia only a few years after forming the band and spent the rest of his life in a mental institution. Because of the unfortunate diagnosis, Bolden was not recognized till later as being an important international music figure with some historians considering him 'The Father of Jazz' Cornet jazz pioneer Joe 'King' Oliver, who mentored Louis Armstrong, credited Bolden as an early influence.

  • Photo provided by Wikimedia -- The Bolden Band around 1905. TOP:Jimmy Johnson (bass), Buddy Bolden (cornet), Willy Cornish (valve trombone), Willy Warner (clarinet). BOTTOM: Brock Mumford (guitar), Frank Lewis (clarinet).

  • Charles Joseph 'Buddy' Bolden

  • Charles Joseph 'Buddy' Bolden