Arthur Hardy: 10 Carnival traditions that ‘ain’t dere no more’

Photo provided by the Arthur Hardy Collection -- For most of a century, the King of Carnival toasted his queen at the Boston Club on Canal Street. The annual ceremonial salute was one of the most photographed moments in all of Mardi Gras.
Photo provided by the Arthur Hardy Collection -- For most of a century, the King of Carnival toasted his queen at the Boston Club on Canal Street. The annual ceremonial salute was one of the most photographed moments in all of Mardi Gras.

Popular traditions now only exist as memories

Not surprisingly, the city’s Carnival celebration has changed many times through the years. While Mardi Gras in New Orleans has never been stronger, baby boomers lament the loss of some traditions — things that “ain’t dere no more.”

Here are 10 traditions that have vanished in recent years:

With its ancient floats that wobbled down St. Charles Avenue, Comus embodied old-world Carnival, with its emphasis on elegance rather than extravagance.