The Wild Side: Gun rights continue in Congress

Ever wonder why history doesn’t have a record of some group trying to ban their brothers and sisters from owning spears or bows and arrows or slings or knives.

Likely because those instruments helped put food on the table. There’s every reason to believe, at least from what’s been published recently, that meat and fire are bigs reason why us humans have the brain power and physical ability to be able to do things like work, recreate, communicate and travel in the ways we do.

Nor did anyone try to ban quarrying flint for arrowheads, cutting orange osage or lemonwood to make bows, or mining ore to make copper, then iron, then steel for those weapons, or an attempt to ban a muzzleloaded musket or rifle.

Modern firearms owners don’t get that pass, and it’s easy to understand why they don’t, but don’t go get your NRA hairs standing on the backs of your necks because you’re reading that here.

It’s easy to understand why the liberal faction among us doesn’t see the need for a modern, cartridge-loaded weapon. If they want meat, they go to a shop where somebody has had to kill and butcher for them, and they think everyone among us who wants to eat meat should do the same.

That’s the problem: Those folks want you to do, think, pray or not pray and act the way they do, and they have very little tolerance for anyone with a different approach to life, even though they ask the same from the opposition.

There continues among us those who use the game and fowl they take with modern firearms to sustain themselves and their families, but those among us who don’t want them to use their firearms for that purpose shouldn’t be allowed to even own those weapons.

Those folks have tried dozens of times in several venues to ban modern firearms. They’ve failed at most every turn.

This battle that some say is a Second Amendment “the right to keep and bear arms” fight continues in Congress in the next days and weeks.

On their return from summer vacation, the U.S. House will consider doubling the already 11 percent tax we pay for handguns and an increase up to four times that tax rate for ammunition. The bill includes a provision to increase the transfer tax from $200 to $500 for weapons included in the National Firearms Act and a transfer tax on all weapons to $100 from the current $5 fee.

Do the same to groceries that feed our families and the gasoline that powers our every existence and there would be a riot on every street corner.

Our government has already accomplished restrictions on hunting: Have you tried to find 22-caliber ammo lately? Or find shotshells or rifle ammo late in our hunting seasons?

This is the worst kind of restriction, one that could make hunting affordable only for a select few, and render our weapons useless.