Tulane joins other schools in asking Feds to bolster support for higher ed

Tulane seeks to stem ‘innovation deficit’

Tulane University President Scott Cowen joined 160 other university presidents and chancellors in signing a letter requesting that the federal government bolster investments in higher education.

The letter, which was published in Politico, asked leaders to close the “innovation deficit,” which is described as the gap between the country’s needed and actual investments in research and higher education.

The letter states that numerous innovations and much of the economic growth of the U.S. since World War II have been the result of federally funded research at universities. It cites vaccines, lasers, the MRI, touch screens and GPS as examples.

The letter argues that the U.S. is falling behind in higher education investments compared to nations like China, Singapore and South Korea.

“The federal government’s partnership with universities has, to a great extent, built our country as we know it today,” Cowen said. “We need a continued commitment to this partnership in order to grow our economy and improve the lives of our citizens.”

LSU’s dental school receives grant

The LSU school of dentistry has been awarded a five-year $1.8 million grant to educate dental hygiene students about caring for patients with HIV and AIDS.

The grant, awarded by the Health Resources and Services Administration, will be used at community clinics in Alexandria and New Orleans.

It’s the third consecutive grant the school has been awarded for the program, which has been funded since 2002.

“Thousands of patients have received dental care at these clinics,” said Robert Barsley, who directs the program. Barsley said that approximately 1,100 patients had been served at the two locations.

Loyola students, staff win awards

Loyola University public relations staff and student journalists from the Maroon newspaper combined to win six awards at the 55th annual Press Club of New Orleans Excellence in Journalism Contest.

The Maroon won second place in the Print Special Section category for its Centennial section, which provided a historical retrospective on Loyola with a combination of original writing and historical archives.

Individual winners were: Maroon cartoonist Sydney Barbier, second place in cartoon; Precious Esie, third place in infographic; Daniel Quick, third place in editorial-print.

The work of the office of marketing and communications garnered awards in two categories. Loyola’s partnership with FSC Interactive for the 100 Days of Giving fundraising campaign won first place in the Public Relations Social Media category while Loyola’s Centennial Celebration won third place in the Public Relations Campaign category.

UNO program now accredited

The University of New Orleans’ master of public administration program is now professionally accredited by the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs and Administration.

“This is a major milestone for our MPA students, faculty and alumni,” said John Kiefer, associate professor of political science and director of the program. “It’s a validation of the program we offer to provide leaders in government and nonprofit management.”

The NASPAA standards are the quality benchmark used by graduate public service programs around the world. Accredited programs must contribute to the knowledge, research, and practice of public service, establish observable goals and outcomes, and use information about their performance to guide program improvement.

There are 172 other NASPAA accredited programs at 162 universities around the world.

Xavier approves faculty promotions

Xavier University of Louisiana has approved the promotions of 10 faculty members in eight disciplines for the 2013-2014 academic year, according to Loren Blanchard, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs.

Those promoted to full professorships were: Galina Goloverda in chemistry, Elliott Hammer in psychology and Joe Ricks in business.

Those promoted to associate professors were: Amy Bellone-Hite in sociology, Vladimir Kolesnichenko and Anderson Sunda-Meya in physics, Robin Vander in English, and Kun (Karen) Zhang in computer science.

Rondall Allen and Dr. Joseph LaRochelle were both promoted to clinical associate professors in the College of Pharmacy’s Division of Clinical and Administrative Sciences.

Compiled by the New Orleans bureau