8 students honored for work  on yearbook

Eight Southeastern Louisiana University students have been honored with Gold Circle Awards from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association for their work on the university’s 2012 yearbook, “Le Souvenir,” university officials said.

Assistant Editor Emily Melancon, a special education senior, of Prairieville, received a second-place certificate for her “academic spread,” while Chelsee LaMarca, a kinesiology senior, of Ponchatoula, and the editor of the 2012 yearbook received a third-place certificate for her “organizations or Greeks spread” and a certificate of merit for her “people spread with mug photos.”

Ryne Berthelot, a communication junior, of Denham Springs, and Christopher Martin, a communication junior, of Albany, received a joint second-place certificate for “sidebar writing” in the yearbook. Martin, who is the assistant editor for Southeastern’s student newspaper “The Lion’s Roar,” also received a certificate of merit for his photography portfolio.

Michael Dinino Jr., an art sophomore, of Prairieville, received a certificate of merit for his “division page design.”

Katelyn Robillard, a biology senior, of Brusly, received a second-place certificate for her “multi-page academic spread.

Tony Romain, an art senior, of Slidell, received a second-place certificate for his “multi-page sports spread” and two certificates of merit for his “sports photography” and photography portfolio.

Bryan Perissutti, a history senior, of Slidell, received a third-place certificate for his “sports feature writing.”

“Working on the ‘Le Souvenir’ was a neat opportunity that exposed me to aspects of Southeastern I wouldn’t otherwise have been able to experience,” Melancon said. “The staff included many talented individuals who helped completing the yearbook both fun and very rewarding. I am honored to have been a part of the successes this yearbook has brought to those individuals and to Southeastern.

The 2012-2013 Gold Circle Awards attracted nearly 16,000 entries from colleges, universities and secondary schools throughout the United States. The awards are presented at the association’s annual convention in New York City. The Gold Circle Awards recognize superior work by student journalists and are judged by a panel of experienced journalists and educators.

The Columbia Scholastic Press Association was founded in 1925 to help unite student editors and faculty advisers to produce student newspapers, magazines, yearbooks and online media. The association is affiliated with the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.