Smiley: Heating up Alaska

Charlanne C. Cress, of Zachary, says her sister, LSU graduate Kathy Chapoton Buser, has been a resident of Big Lake, Alaska, for 37 years.

Kathy spent six days in New Orleans during Carnival with 13 Alaskan friends, “Kathy’s Krewe of Alaskans.”

Says Charlanne, “The food took their taste buds on an unforgettable journey! They embraced every Louisiana delicacy possible.”

This led to the establishment of “Louisiana Foods Day” in Nome, Alaska, March 14.

It’s at the end of the Iditarod Sled Dog Race, where Charlanne says brother-in-law Martin Buser, four-time champion, will seek his fifth trophy.

“I recently shipped to Nome Creole red beans, jambalaya mix, Tabasco sauce, Louisiana-grown rice, étouffée mix, Zatarain’s seasoning and Community Coffee. Trust me, Nome will never be the same!”

A quick bust

Vivian Cupples offers this true crime story:

“Some 40 years ago a group of young buds who lived around LSU came up with a scheme to get free breakfast.

“Back then the whole neighborhood left notes at their door for the milkman. So, all they had to do was add one quart of chocolate milk to their neighbors’ notes, then lay in wait for the milkman to deliver in the dark early morning.

“As soon as the chocolate milk was on the neighbor’s stoop, they would ride their bikes over and grab it.”

The hot doughnuts were lifted from the back of a local store where they were delivered before the store opened.

“This worked great the first time, but little did they know it was quite easy for their parents and neighbors to figure out.

“The next milk delivery morning when they met, the leader passed out flashlights and they took off on their bikes.

“There was Mr. Neighbor who was outside in his robe, picking up his milk and talking to the milkman. On another street Mrs. Neighbor was standing on her porch waiting for the milkman.

“One by one lights came on in carports and garages around the neighborhood. Back home their parents were waiting. …

“Today one of these boys is a retired city policeman while another builds prisons.”

Another Smiley

Fred Dupré says, “As an octogenarian and a nine-year cancer survivor, I’ve had many MRI scans.

“I am thankful for the animated ‘Smiley’ face that counts down the seconds and lets me know I can breathe.”

Thank-you note

Northside Humane Society representative Lori D’Arensbourg thanks Cookie Valentine with Victory Academy and the school’s student council for donating pet food they collected and presenting a check to the Humane Society at a recent pet adoption drive:

“Raising Cane’s in Central matched the donation of $350, and Home Key Real Estate donated $500. Approximately 50 students came by the adoption event to make the donation.”

Looking for people

Bill Simon says applications are being taken for the Lions summer camp for special needs children. Go to http://www.lionscamp.org for an application, call the camp at (800) 348-6567, or call Bill at (225) 756-7077.

Musical interlude

Karen Poirrier says she and her husband, Buddy, along with family and friends attended “Opera a la Carte and Operatic Juke Box” Sunday at Boudreaux’s, “enjoying food, fellowship, and singing to support LSU’s Music and Dramatics Arts program.”

She thanks the LSU Opera Patrons Board, Boudreaux’s and Matherne’s for sponsoring this event, and Linda Green and Adrienne Aronstein for coordinating the program:

“During this time of spending cuts to higher education, having the opportunity to enjoy LSU’s faculty and student operatic talents is especially enjoyable.”

Worthy causes

The Volunteers of America Auxiliary hosts its annual Luncheon and Card Party Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Woman’s Club, 259 East Blvd.

There will be card games, raffles, door prizes and lunch. Tickets are $20. Proceeds help clients of Volunteers of America group homes.

For tickets or information call Pasty at (225) 766-2143.

Special People Dept.

No bull!

Marvin McConnell tells of the young city slicker who visited his uncle in the country to experience farm life:

“It was going to be real cold one night, so the farmer told the lad to put the milk cow in the barn.

“He did what he thought his uncle said.

“When he and the farmer went out to milk the next morning, there stands a big bull.

“The farmer turns to the lad and says, ‘No, son, the udder one.’”

Write Smiley at Smiley@theadvocate.com. He can also be reached by fax at (225) 388-0351 or mail at P.O. Box 588, Baton Rouge, LA 70821.