Smiley Anders for Jan. 12, 2012

By smiley anders

Dear Smiley: Mention of Louisiana Creamery reminded me of a sound I’ve not heard for years — the milkman walking up the driveway to our back door.

He had glass bottles, and they would rattle in the metal tray he carried them in.

We lived around the corner from Goudchaux’s, so of course in December I could hear Santa “ho-hoing” once I was in bed at night.

But one thing that really sticks in my mind was the New Year’s celebration. We could hear the boats on the Mississippi tooting their horns at midnight.

Do they still do that? It’s a little hard to hear from Denham Springs.

LINDA H. WHITMAN

Denham Springs

Harding forever

Dear Smiley: Every morning I check DOTD’s traffic website to give Mary a heads-up on traffic conditions before she leaves for downtown Baton Rouge.

For some reason, I was looking over the DOTD map site one day and noticed that Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport, also known as Ryan Field, is labeled “Harding Army Air Field,” its original name.

As I wondered why the DOTD map continues to use the airport’s historic name, I remembered that the Interstate 10 bridge over the Mississippi River is more often called the “new bridge” rather than its official name, the “Horace Wilkinson Bridge.”

It makes me wonder if there are other Baton Rouge places and areas we continue to call by their old names?

Maybe your readers can help.

DUDLEY LEHEW

Denham Springs

Early gifts

Dear Smiley: Your “Jumping the Gun” item (on Dec. 15) brought me unexpected delight — our family has played “Christmas Eve Gift” for as long as I can remember, but I’m not confessing how long that is!

We trace it back to our grandfather, Arch Warnock, in southern Arkansas. Our father brought it with him to south Louisiana.

Since we’ve never met anyone who knew the game, we thought it was unique to our family.

Janet Swain Blazo in Colorado should know that we broke into the electronic version of the game two years ago with emails and Facebook postings from our “next generation!”

Even their children are now trained!

We answer all phone calls on Dec. 24 with “Christmas Eve Gift!”

SUE WARNOCK

Baton Rouge

Loving Bermuda

Dear Smiley: I fully endorse what Janet Moulder wrote about Bermuda Avenue and its inhabitants.

Of the 50 years we have lived in Baton Rouge, more than 42 have been at Bermuda Avenue, and, like Janet, we love our neighbors. They are good and helpful people.

One in particular, Jon, across the street, is the most helpful neighbor you could ever have. He will go out of his way to help his neighbors, and they don’t even have to ask him for help.

About the cultural diversity, we and another neighbor are from Cuba, Jon and his family are from Poland, one household is from the Middle East, and several are African-Americans. We love it here.

ARMANDO CORRIPIO

Baton Rouge

Walk with care

Dear Smiley: My son took his dad and two young sons on an outing to the Tunica Trace. They got out and walked a nature trail.

They had wildlife agents waiting for them at his truck when they got back.

Apparently it’s necessary to have a permit or a valid hunting or fishing license now to WALK on a nature trail there!

Who knew? They were given a written warning because they had none of those.

I would really like to know the reason behind this and how people are supposed to know they can’t just go on a Saturday afternoon walk with their family.

There were no obvious signs, and nothing in the printed literature available there warning of this.

MARY L. PETERSON

Central

Twitter patter

Dear Smiley: It’s interesting how quickly the language is changing.

A recent story in The Advocate (“LSU’s Minter to enter NFL draft”) refers to an LSU player considering entering the NFL draft, saying the player “tweeted Monday” and “then tweeted on Tuesday,” without ever mentioning Twitter (assuming, of course, that he had done the tweeting on Twitter, and not vocally).

RONNIE STUTES

Baton Rouge

Bottom line

Dear Smiley: Doug Johnson spoke of stressed jeans and the pride of wearing them.

In the early ’70s, I saw a teenage girl rubbing jeans on the sidewalk.

When I asked what she was doing, she replied that a little wear on the seat of the jeans made their behinds look cute.

I thought that was the stupidest thing I had ever heard until a few months later when my friends and I, having conducted independent research, agreed that she was absolutely right.

CLAYTON J. JOFFRION

Baton Rouge

Write Smiley at Smiley@theadvocate.com. He can also be reached by fax at (225) 388-0351 or mail at P.O. Box 588, Baton Rouge, LA 70821.