Smiley: Sweet smell of crawfish

After Patsy Borie mentioned an April crawfish boil at an Oregon winery in the shadow of Mount Hood, we heard from former Louisiana guy Bert Broussard, now in Anacortes, Wash.:

“Hope she knows that any true Cajun can smell out a crawfish boil from five miles. Depending on the amount of Zatarain’s, of course.

“As I recall, most wineries are on the north side of Mount Hood. Depending on wind direction, I might be able to smell it from there.

“Just might take a wine tasting tour of the Oregon wineries in April.

“I like my crawfish with a light Pinot Noir. Or any beer that’s handy.”

The Jake’s alternative

Cary Owen comments on that Oregon crawfish boil:

“If Oregon weather turns typical (gray and drizzling), the hillsides are drenched and the view of Mount Hood is obscured by the mist, Patsy and family might want to try Jake’s Famous Crawfish Restaurant in Portland, where I once took my family.”

Although, he adds, “Looking at their menu online, I am hard pressed to find many crawfish dishes.”

Here’s the beef

Serious corned beef enthusiasts always look forward to March, when Beth Shalom Synagogue sells corned beef sandwich lunches.

The 29th annual sale is Sunday for drive-through and pickup at the synagogue, 9111 Jefferson Highway.

On Monday and Tuesday you also can drive through, but orders of five or more lunches can be delivered to businesses.

The $9 sack lunch includes corned beef on rye, chips, pickle and homemade brownie. For tickets or to place orders call (225) 924-6773 or email bethshalom-admin@earthlink.net.

Nice People Dept.

Dr. Joe Ricapito says that after he and his wife dined at a favorite restaurant, he was presented the check and realized he had forgotten his wallet:

“Naturally, I paled as I thought of the pile of dishes, cups, glasses and other kitchen implements I would have to wash.

“My wife didn’t bring her purse — because she knows I always bring my wallet. Not this time.

“I had the server call the manager, and a gentleman came to the table. I explained my dilemma, and said I could write him a check for the dinner and tip — knowing that he has a ‘no checks’ rule.

“He turned out to be the owner, and said that would be OK, because he recognized us.

“Who said there was a scarcity of nice people in this world?”

Looking for people

Charles Mouton-Lanphier says the Regional Healthcare Group needs volunteers for its hospice program:

“Duties range from office assistance to sitting/reading with the patient, light housework and running errands.”

Email cmlanphier@rhcg.net or call (225) 928-8989.

Happy returns

Doug Treadway says we often run notes from folks whose purse or wallet was found and returned.

In his case, there was not much monetary value involved, but he still wants to report a nice gesture:

“I always take something to read when I go shopping in case I get stuck in line. I recently left an old paperback novel at the Albertson’s on College.

“When I went to the customer service counter, there it was. I want to thank whoever found the book and turned it in and the considerate employees who were willing to spend time and effort in such a mundane but highly appreciated pursuit.

“I finished the book last night — the good guy got the bad guy!”

Special People Dept.

Stan Blouin, a World War II veteran, celebrates his 90th birthday Thursday.

On Thursday Jess and Rita Walker celebrate 60 years of marriage.

Sure cure

MawMaw Betty, of French Settlement, says my mention of the song “Hadacol Boogie” brought back memories of another famed remedy: “Castor oil was the tool mothers used to get kids to go to school when they faked illness.

“When we were growing up (there were seven of us) and pretended to be sick, Mama would get out the castor oil.

“You never saw kids fly out of bed so quick.

“I still remember the flavor, and would hop on the school bus now before I would take a spoonful of that.”

Do it yourself — please

Algie Petrere tells of the guy who noticed the type on his printer was growing faint and called a local repair shop.

There a friendly man informed him that the printer probably needed only to be cleaned.

The store charged $50 for cleaning, so the man told him he might be better off reading the manual and doing the job himself.

Pleasantly surprised by his candor, the guy asked, “Does your boss know that you discourage business?”

“Actually, it’s my boss’s idea,” the employee replied sheepishly. “We usually make more money on repairs if we let people try to fix things themselves first.”

Write Smiley at Smiley@theadvocate.com. He can also be reached by fax at (225) 388-0351 or mail at P.O. Box 588, Baton Rouge, LA 70821.