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A map listing homicides or suspected homicides in EBR Parish.
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Current gas prices in BR area.

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 27, 2014

We’ll watch three areas, one in the Gulf and two systems in the Atlantic. The months August and September hold the distinction as the worst months for hurricanes and tropical storms for Louisiana. On August 26, 1992, Hurricane Andrew made landfall 20 miles southwest of Morgan City. It ranked number 4 as the most intense land falling United… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 26, 2014

With access to a variety of weather resources, opinions are easily advanced via social media. Observers can access radar, satellites and forecast models, putting them in the eye of the storm from their home. In 1977, while at the “other” station, my friend and co-worker, Grey Hammett, retrieved four-hour-old satellite pictures from the National Weather Service Office in… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 25, 2014

Before Katrina, Hurricane Andrew was the costliest hurricane in U.S. history. On this date, two years ago, we were tracking Tropical Storm Isaac. Gustav was the worst storm to hit Baton Rouge. Andrew recorded five official landfalls including its final landing as a category 3 storm on our coast. Storms that cause extensive destruction are sealed in our… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 24, 2014

On a visit to Las Vegas in 2012, we enjoyed an excursion to the Hoover or Boulder Dam and Lake Mead. Hydrologists report that 63 trillion gallons of ground water have been lost in the West due to drought. Lake Mead is at its lowest level since the Hoover Dam was constructed in the 1930s.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 23, 2014

Once a lot is selected, the positioning of the house is determined by the prevailing wind. My grandfather stationed our Pennsylvania house in relationship to the prevailing north wind. Built in the early 1900s, his house had the front door facing west and the back door facing east. The north and south sides bore the brunt of… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 22, 2014

I have used the word “Tabascoey” as another adjective for our summertime weather. A few years ago I received a call from a gentleman questioning permission to use “Tabascoey” in my weather forecasts and this column. After numerous barbs, jokes and kidding, he identified himself as the late Paul McIlhenney from the McIlhenny family of New Iberia and… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 21, 2014

Furthering Tuesday’s column when Dutch explorer Adrian Block described an unusually large white oak growing in a clearing on what is now Hartford, Connecticut. In the 1930s, a delegation of Native Americans approached the property’s owner where the tree was located. Intending to remove the tree, Samuel Wyllys preserved it because it was planted ceremonially for the sake… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 20, 2014

The Hurricane Center in Miami could be identifying a tropical depression today or tomorrow. Many of our readers will remember this date. On August 20, 1969, clean-up from Hurricane Camille was underway. The storm caused flooding and mudslides in the James and York River basins in Virginia. Rainfall totals were 31 inches with 109 fatalities. On October 21,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 19, 2014

The village of Green Bank is nestled in the Allegheny Mountain Range and may be one of the quietest places on Earth. It’s the home of the Green Bank Telescope, operating under the auspices of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In 1958, the Federal Communications Commission created a 13,000-square-mile quiet zone to shield Green Bank’s radio telescopes from… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 18, 2014

Louisiana boasts 14 lighthouses, the oldest dating back to 1839. In August, 1789, the First Congress federalized existing lighthouses. Built by the colonists, funds were appropriated for lighthouses, beacons and buoys. As noted in a previous column, the lighthouse safely directed ships through episodes of fog and storms. Sound was used to guide ships and in… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 16, 2014

In May 2012, Gary Connery donned a wing suit and performed a 3,000 foot base jump onto 24,000 cardboard boxes in Henley Upon Thames for a world record. On July 25, 2012, Felix Baumgartner freefell for four minutes at 536 mph, opening his chute for the worlds highest skydive. On this date in 1960, Air Force… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 15, 2014

Baby powder isn’t just for the baby, especially at this time of the year. I shared this with our Sports Director, Mike Cauble, noting that many athletes use it before they suit up to reduce sweat and discomfort. I also told him I use the lavender, Johnson’s baby powder. He told me to, “Get Lost!” We did not… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 13, 2014

The Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean and Atlantic are quiet but on this date in 1766, a powerful hurricane leveled the tiny village of Trois-Islets on the island of Martinique. As noted, Joseph-Gaspard Tascher was one of the island’s wealthy planters and suffered total financial ruin from the devastating storm. In dire straits, he did what many attempted in… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 12, 2014

Weather oddities on this date include to men resting near a stream in the Tatra mountains, bordering Slovakia and Poland in 1927. Stones began falling from the sky, splashing the water and hitting their heads. Attempting to seek shelter in a nearby inn, they were “tossed out” as the inn keeper believed the devil followed them inside. In… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 8, 2014

Events on this date include Tropical Storm Bret, in 1993, hitting Venezuela with 100 casualties. In 1922, the improving Pittsburgh Pirates recorded 46 hits in a double-header against the Phillies and in 2001, the artificial turf at a Phillies game reached 149 degrees as 24 fans were treated for exhaustion. In 1963 the Kingsmen recorded “Louie-Louie.” In… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 6, 2014

In 1874, Robert Green operated a booth in Philadelphia. He ran out of ice, went to his friend’s ice cream booth and substituted ice cream for ice. His root beer “floated” the ice cream and a new treat was invented. Today is National Root Beer Float Day and when we were kids Hire’s Root Beer Extract was mixed… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 5, 2014

Expect episodes of lightning today. Around 300 A.D. a father was so enraged when his daughter converted to Christianity, he beheaded her. Following the decapitation he was killed by lightning. His daughter was anointed St. Barbara Dioscorus, patron saint of lightning victims. British military officer, Maj. R. Summerford, while on the battlefield in Flanders on February, 1918, was… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 4, 2014

In the Daly & Spraggs Drug Store in Waynesburg, PA, a customer told owner Byron Daly that it would rain on July 29th. Questioning how he knew, the customer responded that it always rained on his birthday – July 29th. Daly began wagering customers, not for cash but a hat. For 136 years, it rained in Waynesburg… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 3, 2014

As rainwater falls it is naturally soft. Entering the ground and into waterways, it gathers a variety of minerals, including chalk, lime, calcium and magnesium, transferring the water from soft to hard. These minerals also assist in providing taste and nutrition for our drinking water. Baton Rouge claims the second-best drinking water in the country. Years… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 1, 2014

My daughter Katie gifted me a “Cool-Towel” while doing my outdoor chores. The chemically enhanced towel provides relief once dampened. Years ago, my friend, Todd Rossnagel shared a story about his Dad, J.R. During his golf outings, a small bucket contained hand towels that were soaked in water and rubbing alcohol. Once he “wrung-out” the towel the alcohol… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 31, 2014

Years ago, representatives of Kentucky Fried Chicken located a “Hotter than Hell” city, identified in a town about a half-hour from Ann Arbor, Michigan. Also located about an hour from Detroit, the town has an ice cream shop that makes sundaes in “coffins,” and a traditional “Run through Hell” race. The town is Hell, Michigan, that offers other… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 30, 2014

On July 29, 1945, moon rise over the Philippine Sea occurred at 10:30 p.m. Because of the illumination, Japanese submariners targeted the silhouette of a cruiser and torpedoed it. If not for the moon glow, the USS Indianapolis would have passed unnoticed. As noted in a previous column, SKY and TELESCOPE magazine predicted a repeat of this celestial… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 29, 2014

We recently noted how turkey vultures avoid overheating. The black-tailed jackrabbit also has a built-in cooling apparatus. Due to its oversize ears, these trademark appendages increase the hare’s audio range to avoid predators. Due to the abundance of blood vessels, its 7-inch ears are also a cooling mechanism that dissipate heat and regulate body temperature. The black-tailed jackrabbit… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 28, 2014

As noted in Sunday’s column, heat waves initiated cool-downs. Years ago, the inflatable pool was “shot-up” by Doug Kelly’s B.B. gun. Mom instructed us to fill the wash tub with cold water and stick my brother Kevin in there for a few days. He enjoyed it even though his lips were purple. Once Dale and… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 27, 2014

The Heat Index could register above the 100 degree mark this weekend. Keep the A.C. humming, the ceiling fans rotating and stay hydrated. As noted in a previous column, my mother instructed me to fill the washtub so that my brother Kevin would get a “cool-down” during episodes of blistering weather in Pennsylvania. That same… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 26, 2014

The Daily Telegraph reports that the bodies of more than 80 soldiers from World War I have been recovered from melting glaciers. Experts from the Archaeological Heritage Office in Trento, Italy, report that the mummified bodies of the soldiers were discovered near the small northern town of Peio. Glaciers began to melt in the 1990s and… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 25, 2014

It’s been a tough season for wildfires in the West and Pacific Northwest. The Carlton Complex Fire in Seattle is still burning. Lightning sometimes causes these fires. In 1945 Albert Staehle drew a uniformed bear with a name inspired by New York City fireman “Smokey Joe” Martin, becoming Smokey Bear. In 1947, Smokey’s trademark slogan, “Only You Can… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 24, 2014

Canis Major or Sirius was designated the “Dog Star” by ancient astronomers. As noted in a previous column, Romans believed that Sirius rose at sunrise, convinced this star was the cause of hot, sultry weather. To appease the rage of Sirius and believing that the star created the weather pattern, they sacrificed a brown dog, thus the reference-Dog… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 23, 2014

On this date in 1893, Father Benito Vines died in Havanna, Cuba. Father Vines is regarded as the pre-eminent hurricane scholar of the 19th century. As director of the observatory at Belen College in Havana in 1870, he catalogued meticulous weather observations and conditions, especially during tropical disturbances. His observations became a climatological catalog for future forecasts. Notations… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 22, 2014

This month, you may have been thinking of Abe Doumar, Albert Kabbaz, Arnold Fornachou or David Avayou. All claim the invention of the ice cream cone. July is Ice Cream Month and the Library of Congress identifies Charles E. Menches as the inventor. He and his brother Frank also claim the invention of the hamburger in Hamburg, New… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 21, 2014

When Frank Epperson was 11, he took a wooden stir stick, placed it in soda pop and placed it outside one wintry New York evening. As noted in a previous column, Frank enjoyed the frozen treat the next day. In 1923, Frank used a Birch tongue depressor to hold the frozen delight and applied for a patent… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 20, 2014

During our summer afternoon’s the convective showers and thundershowers can drop the temperature from 92 degrees to 77 in 20 minutes. Air conditioning crews stay busy preparing and repairing the “A.C.” units making sure they are “humming along.” As mentioned in previous column, last Friday marked the 111th anniversary of the invention of modern air conditioning. In the… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 19, 2014

‘The Big One, then Another’ Following the Johnstown Pennsylvania Flood of 1889, a flood control system was constructed in the Little Conemaugh Valley to withstand a 100-year flood. Experts declared that the city of Johnstown was flood-proof. As noted in a previous column, on July 19, 1977, in west Taylor Township, northwest of Johnstown, a… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 18, 2014

On this date in 1689, lightning zapped the altar church of Saint-Sauveur, in Ligny, France. Fifty witnesses watched a statue of Christ levitate and as noted in a previous column, altar cloths were scorched and curtains were blown off their rings but the rings remained on the rod. In 1812, in Combe Hay, Somerset, U.K., six sheep were… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 17, 2014

The British Open begins today and the four day weather expectations include partly sunny skies and light winds. Heavy showers will erupt on Saturday with windy conditions and temperatures dipping to 60 degrees by Sunday. Beginning in 1860, this is the oldest of the four major tournaments. Weather has always been an important element in the play of… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 16, 2014

The National Climatic Data Center analyzed climate data from 1981 to 2010 and constructed a map depicting the peak summer heat. Most locations will experience a lot more summer weather and haven’t experienced their warmest day of the year. For the southwest, the warmest weather traditionally occurs before the end of June. Phoenix and Tucson report average highs… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 15, 2014

Statistically, nearly 25 million cloud-to-ground lightning hits occur each year. The yearly average reflects 52 people killed each year from direct or near hits. Lightning can strike within ten miles of a thunderstorm. After completing some chores and assignments Sunday evening I decided to adhere to my exercise schedule by taking a “run” through the neighborhood on… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 14, 2014

The British Medical Journal reports that emergency room visits for kids increase as temperatures increase. An online edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal based their research on patterns of hospital treatments in 21 emergency rooms throughout England. Their data found that a five degree increase in temperature increased admissions for kids. A drop in temperature by… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 13, 2014

Saturday’s column recognized the hottest spot in the United States, Death Valley, and a reading of 134 degrees on July 10,1913 -- the highest temperature in North America and worldwide until September 13, 1922, when El Azizia, Libya, reported 136 degrees. The Death Valley reading was recorded at Furnace Creek Ranch from July 8 through the 14,,1913.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 12, 2014

Death Valley National Park incorporates 5,000 square miles in California’s Mojave Desert in the Sierra Nevada mountain range. The range includes peaks which are 11,000 foot above sea level. Badwater Basin is 28 feet below sea level. This area records an average rainfall of about 2 inches per year. Cooler, moisture-laden air from the Pacific rapidly dries… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 10, 2014

With the persistent wet weather, I located a letter in my files from Doug Haley who catalogued Earth’s heaviest recorded rainfall. He noted that 383 inches of rain per hour fell during the Great Flood of the Bible, approximately 4,461 years ago. Citing Genesis 7:12 he writes: “The duration of rainfall was 40 days and 40 nights.” He… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 9, 2014

Many believe that crickets chirp more in warm weather than during cold times. In 1897, physicist Amos Dolbear believed that the cricket was a thermometer. Not only do crickets chirp for a mate but they also correspond to “Dolbear’s Law” which incorporated listening, counting and addition to determine the outside temperature. This is how it works. Listen and… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 8, 2014

Monday’s column identified the famous “Year Without a Summer.” It was 1816 and it occurred as a result of the eruption of Mount Tambora. The volcano discharged dust and sulfurous gases that spread around the globe. The diary of Hiram Harwood of Bennington, Vermont, noted that on June 11, 1817, frigid temperatures found New Englanders building “roaring fires… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 7, 2014

Mount Tambora, on the island of Sumbawa, erupted in April of 1815. This incident was the most explosive eruption in 10,000 years. At the end of the volcano’s convulsions, 4,200 feet of its 13,000 foot height were gone as 25 cubic miles of ash was released into the atmosphere. In an area of 200 miles… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for July 6, 2014

Supplies in the 16th and 17th centuries were transported by ship. One product, needed by agricultural interests, was manure. Collectors would bundle the lighter, dry manure. The bundles were stored below deck for the journey, and on the open sea, salt water and storms often soaked cargo in the lower holds. Wet weather returned manure to its… Continue reading →