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Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 19, 2014

During episodes of cold weather, Chester Greenwood was cursed with throbbing, aching ears. They would change color when the temperature dipped below freezing. His ears would first turn pale white, then vivid red and finally blue. As noted in a previous column, Chester had no trouble doing chores when the weather was above freezing, but once… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 18, 2014

We continue our column from Wednesday with Wilbur and Orville Wright’s designation of Kitty Hawk for their first flight. On Sept. 15, 1903, a Category 2 hurricane hit the Outer Banks with 72 mph winds. When the Wrights arrived at their camp at nearby Kill Devil Hills 10 days later, the shed that housed their glider… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 17, 2014

In 1899, Orville and Wilbur Wright had never heard of Kitty Hawk, N.C. Requesting wind velocities in the Chicago area from the United States Weather Bureau, Professor Willis Moore forwarded copies of the “Monthly Weather Review,” containing average wind speeds from across the country. One station was a small community in the Outer Banks of North Carolina.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 16, 2014

“Gloves or Mittens” Gloves were in use for November and a couple of days in December. Mittens are more effective for hand warming. Exposed body parts such as ears, nose, toes and fingers are vulnerable. Hunters, fishing enthusiasts and golfers may experience “chilbains,” caused by prolonged exposure to cold, damp weather. As noted in a previous column,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 15, 2014

Saturday’s column described “winter count,” by which Native Americans chronicled the winter season. During harsh winters, tribes hibernated and sketched images of battles, deaths of leaders and extreme climate conditions. In 1686, John K. Bear noted, “Ice all over the land.” In 1711 Batiste Good journaled, “Four lodges drowned winter” and Ben Kindle reported in 1773,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 13, 2014

In our younger years, a heavy snowfall sent us outdoors. Neighborhood pine trees offered a traditional winter prank. I would encourage my brother Kevin to stand under the snow laden branches. I would then vigorously shake the branches, unloading 20 pounds on his head. Another “big snow” treat was lying down on the bank of our… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 12, 2014

The Rouse Simmons sank during a winter gale on November 23, 1912. For 30 years the schooner brought Christmas trees from Michigan and Wisconsin to Chicago. As noted in a previous column, it would arrive at Chicago’s docks in early December, decorated with Christmas lights. The public boarded the ship, purchasing balsam, pine trees, garland and wreaths and… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 11, 2014

A look-back” to this date in 2008 found a developing low along the Texas coast, tracking northeast, edging closer to south Louisiana. During the evening hours, the National Weather Service predicted a possible “wintry mix” in our area at daybreak. The Channel 2 weather team was “on-the-fence” as to whether it would be a sleet or snow event.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 8, 2014

When lightning strikes planes, the charges glide from nose to tail or from wing tip to wing tip before discharging. Today, airliners have on-board radar to track storms and wind shear. These technological advances prevent lightning from disrupting an aircraft. As noted in a previous column, over Elkton, Maryland, on December 8, 1963, Pan Am Flight 214 was… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 7, 2014

Our unseasonably warm weather won’t deter families from heading to the country today to cut a tree. Limited space finds some folks hanging a Christmas tree upside down, which could compromise needed water. This practice originated in the 700s. The Little Blue Book for Advent and the Christmas Season notes that St. Boniface, an eighth-century English… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 6, 2014

The coaching change at Michigan prompted recollections of another coaching change in 1950. The game against Ohio State on Nov. 25, 1950, was during the worst snowstorm to hit Ohio since 1913. Mike Sause and his brother Kit attended the game with their dad and brother Bill. Mike noted, “We wore so much clothing we couldn’t… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 5, 2014

The continual warm weather is keeping us in shirts and possibly shorts. It was a limited wardrobe for our grandfather, Bert Price. He wore the same clothing everyday, no matter what the weather. His wardrobe consisted of cotton long johns, heavy socks, flannel shirt, a railroad hat, bib overalls or pants with suspenders and work gloves. He kept… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 4, 2014

The needed rain in California won’t put a dent in their drought. It is wet-weather season there and no season compares to what the state experienced 153 years ago. From December, 1861 to January, 1862, a 30 day event translated to a 30,000 year flood event. Rain was reported in the state on 28 out of 39 days.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 3, 2014

The New York Times reports that large portions of the West Antarctica Ice Sheet is collapsing at an irreversible trend. Scientists report that climate change is once again the culprit. Two studies found that naturally occurring warm water is being advanced upward toward the ice sheet as stronger winds blow into the Antarctica region. This combination is creating… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 1, 2014

December, 2014 is coming in like a “lamb.” Years ago, snow covered Baton Rouge before our Coats for Kids distribution. Historical events for the end of November and the first days of December include extremely cold weather on November 29, 1831. This event “iced-over” the Northeast, closing New York’s Erie Canal through December. On December 1, 1969,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 30, 2014

It’s been two weeks since we experienced a thunderstorm event. As we wrap-up our Thanksgiving weekend, we advance to Advent and preparations for Christmas. The “Yule Log” wasn’t just for Christmas. In Germany, the burning of a large block of oak, called a Yule Log, is a time-honored tradition. This tradition predates Christianity and may have some… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 28, 2014

Hurricane Season 2014 ends tomorrow with eight named storms, six hurricanes and two major hurricanes. The Saturday evening weather after Thanksgiving 1898 in New England was rapidly deteriorating. In 90-mile-per-hour winds and 30-foot seas, The Portland’s captain was known as a “storm racer” and would regularly make runs from Boston to Portland, Maine. The steamship was… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 28, 2014

Snow blanketed the northeast for the weekend, reminding me of another snow related directive. Weathercasters track storms, hunters track game and civil servants are diligent to keep us on track. After a heavy rain or snow event our mom, Grandma Shirley, would insist we use the “side door” of the house for entry. It afforded us an opportunity… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 27, 2014

William Bradford was not only the Governor of Plymouth Plantation but also a historian. He chronicled the difficulties of the Pilgrim’s crossing. The decision to land on the shores of Massachusetts was dictated by weather. The small, 180-ton ship, The Mayflower, sailed near the southeastern tip of Cape Cod on November 19, 1620; expecting to hold course and… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 25, 2014

Looking back 37 years found me at my girlfriend’s home for Thanksgiving. Her “Muth-aa” informed me that I incorrectly pronounced Houston -”eweston” and humid - “u-mid.” Conversation at Mom’s Thanksgiving table requires an interpreter. “You have something comin’ up,” means an item on your schedule or an upset stomach. “Reddin’ up,” is a directive to straighten your room.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 24, 2014

It originated as a day to give thanks for the harvest, to embrace relationships between family and friends and an invitation to neighbors. As noted in a previous column, original traditions included the wild turkey and the pumpkin pie. Long before the arrival of pilgrims, pumpkins were used as a food source, for medicinal purposes and even pounded,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 23, 2014

Turkey and weather complement Thanksgiving. Back in the old college days we would load as many guys into a car as possible for the trek home. At Gannon University, Marty DeRose was the wheel man, transporting fraternity brothers to Meadville, Ellwood City and Beaver Falls, Pa. We left Erie on Wednesday afternoon in 1968 with clouds… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 22, 2014

From 1979 through 1981, I commuted to Pittsburgh from Baton Rouge every week. I returned home to showcase the weather on WPXI, the NBC affiliate. My wife, Mabyn, remained at home here in Baton Rouge. On one Monday morning I landed in Pittsburgh with snow falling at a rapid rate. By the time I reached my… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 19, 2014

When Thomas Jefferson was Governor of Virginia, he designated 60 acres of land in Bourbon County, Kentucky for farming. Pioneers were instructed to build a permanent structure to raise, store and export “native corn.” Corn was too perishable and bulky for transporting. Families consumed limited amounts of it so ingenious farmer’s utilized Kentucky’s resources of water, climate and… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 18, 2014

During the very early days of air travel, unidentified flying objects were not referenced when folks looked to the skies. On November 17, 1896, hundreds in Sacramento watched three lights, illuminating a dark and stormy sky. The unusual object traveled 350 yards as it skirted rooftops. Five days later the object took a half-hour to cross another town… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 17, 2014

Sunday’s column recognized mistakes that should be avoided during winter. Some were more appropriate for other locales that include selecting a snow shovel that will reduce stress on your spine. Stretching before shoveling is also suggested. Using an electric heater to thaw frozen pipes could lead to electrocution. Applying heat with a hair dryer from the faucet to… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 16, 2014

Two consecutive days of frigid weather, including a record low, found the weather team extending preparation suggestions. Ours include protecting plants, warming up the pets and visiting the elderly. Pipe protection can be initiated for future cold snaps. The Weather Channel provided suggestions on 20 mistakes you should avoid during winter. Some include pouring hot water on… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 15, 2014

It’s opening day of duck season for the Coast and West zones. Luke Guarisco holds the title as champion duck caller for the Avoca and Pecan Island duck clubs. Along with the “Duck Dynasty” stars Austin McCullough and Hayes Alexander, Luke judges callers. Geese fly in a “V” formation to provide 80 percent greater range than… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 13, 2014

With the sugar cane harvest completed, the production of molasses will continue. The Mancivalano family operates the Adams Farm in southern Vermont. Since 1865 the farm has included a dairy, timber production and the construction of sap tanks. The mainstay of the farm is its production of maple syrup. Ideal tree tapping includes cold nights and 50-degree days… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 10, 2014

For cattle and sheep ranchers a “stocking rate” reflects how many animals a designated area of acreage will support. The USDA/Agricultural Research Center noted the unpredictability of precipitation causes difficulty for ranchers in the Great Plains to estimate this rate. Scientists use a computer model to assist. By extrapolating seasonal weather predictions, models test scenarios… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 9, 2014

Porches were originally designed to provide space for folks to pause before entering or exiting a home or building. As noted in a previous column, porches in England provided cover for worshippers and for liturgical use. Before a baptism, the priest would begin the service on the porch. In medieval times, a room was added above the porch… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 8, 2014

Growing-up in the northeast, college football games were always played in the afternoon. We followed Pitt, Penn State and especially Notre Dame, where my brother Mike enrolled and local football stars Terry Hanratty and Chuck Landolfi played. Similar to Baton Rouge, football games were limited to just three network channels, so the power of WWL put us… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 7, 2014

On this date in 1940, 35 m.p.h. winds caused a bridge collapse. The city was Tacoma, WA and the structure spanned the Narrows River. Following the official opening, excessive vibration put the bridge into the water. It was thereafter called “Galloping Gertie,” and due to its design and lack of environmental consideration, it was permanently placed into the… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 6, 2014

Moonrise tonight will be at 5:20 pm. This full moon was referenced by Native Americans as the “Full Beaver Moon.” “Honeymoon” dates back to the 1500s when newlyweds enjoyed the fullness of the period after their marriage. Once settled, it was presumed that the experience would wane, similar to a waning moon. Four years ago Erika… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 4, 2014

In 1907 the Italian Royal Academy of Sciences noted that tests of anti-hail cannons weren’t effective and were expensive and useless. By the early twentieth century, anti-hail cannons disappeared. Replacing the cannons were anti-hail rockets that would explode 800 grams of dynamite, above the ground, to prevent hail formation. These explosions caused cold core eddies that surround hail,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 2, 2014

Here’s a few items of interest. Certain species of migratory birds, fish and insects can sense the Earth’s magnetic field and use magnetsome cells in their brains to orient themselves and navigate during migration. In Egypt, visitors breathing inside the great pyramid Chephren at Giza are contributing to its destruction. About 0.7 ounces of water vapor is… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 2, 2014

We said goodbye to Daylight-Saving Time this morning, also referred to as “summer time” in many areas of the world. Daylight-Saving-Time makes the sun “set” one hour later and reduces the period between sunset and bedtime by one hour. The idea was first mentioned by Benjamin Franklin in 1784 and was first advocated by London builder… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 1, 2014

Some believe weather changes create additional cold and allergy symptoms. Our grandfather professed this, and on his nightstand would place a bowl of apples, onions and garlic -- laced with whiskey -- when he experienced chest congestion. As noted in a previous column, mom would send us to school with Vick’s Vapor Rub piled on our chests… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 31, 2014

More than 50 years ago, cold, rain or snow never cancelled our Halloween. As noted in previous columns, gardens in the neighborhood found lingering corn stalks with an ear or two. The gravel-like kernels were twisted from the cob and separated into paper bags. When the shucking ended a prank was underway-for some. Me and my brothers Denis… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 30, 2014

On this date in 2012, New Jersey residents were experiencing the devastation of Superstorm Sandy. In 1991, another storm, referred to as the Halloween Storm, lashed the North Carolina coast for five days. Hurricane-force winds pounded New England and New Jersey causing the highest tides on the Eastern Seaboard since the Great Atlantic Hurricane of ‘44. As noted… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 27, 2014

Sunday’s column noted the origin of the term “threshold.” The origin of this food stuff recognizes a slab of bacon as a sign of a wealthy man who “could really bring home the bacon.” As noted in a previous column, sharing the bacon led to guests “chewing the fat.” The wealthy had plates of pewter while the… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton ‘s Weather News for Oct. 26, 2014

Our daily bath or shower is routine, but that was not the case years ago when the “man of the house” enjoyed the privilege of clean water for his bath. As noted in a previous column, Dad’s “scrub-up” was followed by the other sons, then the women and finally the babies. The dirty water posed a… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 25, 2014

A hoedown is a dance or traditional fiddle tunes. Octobers in high school included the Varsity “R” Hoedown, a fundraiser for the athletic teams that included food, music and cider drinking competitions. One contestant spilled a mug of cider. As my brother Mike cleaned the mess, Bobo Tincani stepped into the cider puddle. Mike told him… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 24, 2014

On Oct. 23, 1947, a cafe in Marksville was suddenly filled with news that fish were falling from the sky. As noted in an archived column, a biologist for the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries provided the following account. “In an 80,000-square-foot area, thousands of freshwater fish, native to local waters, were landing on Main and Monroe… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 22, 2014

Luigi Bombicci, a mineralogist from Bologna, Italy, believed that hail could be prevented. In 1880, his theory of “spherohedron” described the hailstone’s process of crystallization and preventing hail development with sound. In 1896, Albert Steiger, mayor of Windisch-Feistritz, Austria, made the first attempt to defeat hail with the force of sound and did so by using… Continue reading →