Pat Shingleton Weather News for April 19, 2014

Easter egg hunts in the Northeast often include a few snow drifts. Our brother, Mike, resides in Rye Beach N.H., loves Easter egg hunts and is a whacky guy. As a kid, he would hoard his Halloween candy inside a heat duct, never learning that the coal furnace melted his stash as soon as he stored … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton Weather News for April 18, 2014

On April 18, 1927, the Great Flood of Louisiana implemented the existing levee system. Imperfect engineering and shoddy construction caused the collapse of dams, such as the Johnstown Flood of 1889. As noted in a previous column, on May 16, 1874, 138 people died due to poor construction and a dam break in Williamsburg, MA. On March 12, … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton Weather News for April 16, 2014

Our traditional northwest winds that accompany a frontal passage send “whiffs” to us that are either pleasant or offensive. The paper mills in the Felicianas eject a smell that reminds me of the Heinz plants in Pittsburgh. Flowers Baking Company on Florida Blvd. sends an aroma that reminds me of Mom’s kitchen. A south wind advances the odor … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton Weather News for April 15, 2014

Passover began last night at sunset (7:32 PM) and the official full moon rises tonight at 8:10 PM. Astronomers determine a full moon by calculating the percentage of illumination as tonight’s moon will have 100% illumination. One school of thought suggests “light” was needed for the Israelites to leave Egypt, in darkness, and continue their journey out of … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton Weather News for April 13, 2014

“Wind setdown” occurs when strong winds blow over water for an extended period of time, shifting the water body downward. As noted in a previous column, this shift causes a low-angle tilt, and the upwind shore water level drops. “As the sun sank over the Nile Delta, a man stood onshore, raising his rod as a … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for April 12, 2014

Our mom, Grandma Shirley, will be 93 this week. She resides in the house in which she was born, which sits on an acre of land in Ellwood City, Pa. We pool our resources to assist her in daily care, house cleaning and property management. Most lawns in that section of the country encounter damage from … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for April 12, 2014

Our mom, Grandma Shirley, will be 93 this week. She resides in the house in which she was born, which sits on an acre of land in Ellwood City, Pa. We pool our resources to assist her in daily care, house cleaning and property management. Most lawns in that section of the country encounter damage from … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for April 11, 2014

Augusta National includes 122 Magnolia trees that canopy the club’s entrance. Nine years ago, my son, Michael, and I enjoyed the final rounds of The Masters. Our friend Paddy Quigley provided guidance, suggesting placement of portable chairs on No. 18 before walking the course. Our chairs were steps away from the playoff with Tiger Woods and Chris … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for April 10, 2014

In 1943, Augusta National, home of The Masters, suspended play; transformed back into a farm to help the war effort. German prisoners-of- war provided renovation work to erect the famous bridge over Rae’s Creek. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe, became a member of Augusta and a landmark bears his name -The Eisenhower Cabin. … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for April 9, 2014

Our azaleas traditionally “bloom out” by Mid-March, not the case this year. Groundskeepers and horticulturists at Augusta National control their blooming by covering, icing and even heating the plants. It has been an unusual Spring in the south and southeast. I reviewed a column written by Kaitlynn Riely of the Pittsburgh Post Gazette and a bug that invades … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for April 8, 2014

Our “Midnight Storms” caused an extensive amount of damage, especially in the Florida Blvd.-Sherwood Forest area. Large water oaks that have shallow root systems were brought down by straight-line winds. The tragic consequences of storm damage were especially evident on Nassau and Little John Avenues. Fortunately, there were no injuries. As weather broadcasters we constantly encourage viewers to … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for April 2, 2014

Before the initiation of metal baseball bats, the Hellerich and Bradsby “Louisville Slugger” was the bat of choice for the Big Leagues and the Little Leagues. Yesterday’s column noted the difficulties in starting the baseball season in snow and nippy temperatures. Batting gloves “weren’t around” in those days and nothing could prevent the “sting” when the ball connected … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for March 29, 2014

Weatherwise Magazine identified worldwide locales where the sky consistently bathes the land and its inhabitants with year round bliss. The 10th best location is the Manjimup Region of Western Australia. The Coastal Western Cape of Southwestern South Africa makes the ninth slot, and Adelaide, South Australia, is No. 8. Coastal San Diego is No. 7 while … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for March 28, 2014

Years ago, our dear friend, the late Price Leblanc, would call our Weather Center. “Pat Shingleton this is... Price Leblanc, the lightning is scarin’ my cattle! (Click) The Associated Press reports that South Dakota was impacted by a record-breaking snowstorm that buried the western part of the state in early October. Rancher Gary Cammack reported that cattlemen were … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for March 26, 2014

Florida records more lightning hits than any other state but 65 years ago, Capt. Robert Miller and Maj. Ernest Fawbush believed a tornado was going to strike Tinker Air Force base in Oklahoma. As noted in Monday’s column it marked the first time in weather forecasting that a tornado warning was issued and when the two officers ended … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for March 25, 2014

Weather forecasting changed on this date in 1948. As noted in a previous anniversary column, two Air Force weathermen, Air Capt. Robert Miller and Maj. Ernest Fawbush proved, with a certain degree of accuracy, that a prediction could be issued to determine when a tornado would hit. With reams of atmospheric data and a radarscope designed for … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for March 20, 2014

The Vernal Equinox or Spring, “springs” at 11:57 this morning. The season suggests a final end to flying snow and better weather for flying kites. During my weathercasts, years ago, I would “stand” an egg on its end, believing that once it was standing, springtime was official. After years of on-air success, the “yolk” was on me when … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for March 7, 2014

Recently I was introduced to a young lad as, “This is Pat, he plays a weatherman on TV!” Larry David accused a weatherman of predicting rain to keep people off the golf course so he could have it to himself in a scene from Curb Your Enthusiasm. Steve Carell played Brick Tamland in the original “Anchorman: The Legend … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for March 6, 2014

We recorded another episode of ice on Tuesday, adding to the other episodes this season. There’s more ice in the Arctic this year too. According to the National Snow and Ice Data Center about a million more square miles of ocean are covered in ice in 2013 than in 2012; reflecting a 60% increase. Arctic sea ice averaged … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for March 5, 2014

Our forecast Monday evening only emphasized another freeze advisory. Once the mercury dipped to 29 we anticipated the rain to hold off until mid-morning. Not the case as Mom Nature “threw” us enough early rain to flash freeze anything hitting the vegetation and the ground. The Winter Weather Advisory set up a raw Mardi Gras. We almost matched … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for March 4, 2014

In 16 days we’ll welcome springtime and we may tie the number of freeze days for the season. LSU’s Agricultural Department provides guidance for springtime planting dates as some gardeners attest to the importance of the moon phases in assisting plant growth. Every 28 days our moon advances through four phases: new moon, first quarter, full moon and … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for March 3, 2014

Familiar weather expressions include “frog stranglers” and “gully washers” for heavy showers. Another reference to flooding rain is the adage, “It’s gonna come a stump-floater and a gully washer.” Our ancestors may have referred to a rain episode with, “It’s comin’up a cloud!” The mention, “It’s raining pitchforks and plow handles,” meant extremely hard rain. A comment to … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for March 1, 2014

When my brother Kevin and I were proprietors of Zee-Zee Gardens Restaurant and Pub, Jessie Dominick was a favored patron and the only one to have his own parking space. He always commented, “Kevin, you have a head like a Lieeee-un!”(Lion) He also noted that if March came in like a “Lieee-un,” it will go out like a … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 28, 2014

With warmer weather hopefully you’ll be returning to the coast for fishing. Great Lakes locations have enjoyed a great season for ice fishing. On Lake Mille Lacs in Northern Minnesota, anglers drag fully-equipped, four ton houses onto the lake. Resting on two-foot thick ice, these generator powered $20,000 homes include carpet, parquet floors, microwaves, surround-sound, and satellite … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 27, 2014

The Canaveral National Seashore and Everglades National Park have prehistoric shell mounds, 50 to 70 feet high. Scientists believe the mounds served as foundations for structures and settlements. They also served as navigational landmarks during European exploration of the region. These mounds, located on some of Florida’s most pristine beaches, are at risk of washing away. Sea level … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 25, 2014

One of the most difficult wine grapes to produce is the pinot noir. The Santa Rita Hills in Santa Barbara County, California, leads the world in the production of this grape. Weatherwise Magazine reports that a series of mountains in southern California that strike east-to-west are known as the Transverse Ranges. The Mediterranean climate and diverse soils also … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 19, 2014

Dr. Seth Stephens-Davidowitz analyzed tens of millions of Google searches for health related depression over nine years. His research focused on searches that would reflect the prevalence of actual depression or suggestions of emotional dips. What he discovered was another predictor for the impact of weather on mood and the effect of temperature related to medical depression. His … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 8, 2014

California averages around 22 inches of rain per year, while Baton Rouge traditionally picks up more than 50. In 2013, just 7.13 inches fell, making it the driest since 1850. Time magazine reports that the megadrought is so severe that 17 communities across the state could run out of water in two to four months. The … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 7, 2014

It was difficult, in the early days of firefighting, to get the wet stuff onto the red stuff. Bucket brigades were embraced as the best method of firefighting and “stand pipes” were positioned and attached to the municipal water systems. As noted in a previous column, freezing weather became a greater obstacle to fight fire and prevent a … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 26, 2013

Weather sometimes takes the blame for seasonal colds. My grandfather believed in this philosophy and placed a bowl of apples, onions, and garlic, laced with whiskey, on his nightstand when he experienced chest congestion. Mom would send us to school with Vick’s Vapo-Rub piled on our chest and throat, preventing me from getting a “date.” Another application was … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 25, 2013

This week we presented a series of unusual weather occurrences that began with a historical report of falling fish in Marksville. Today’s example could be referenced to the Flintstones, entitled “Pebbles and Bam-Bam.” On this date in 1973, “The Almanac of the Infamous, Incredible and Ignored,” presented a story about two fishermen in Upstate New York. Their expedition … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 23, 2013

On October 23, 1947, a cafe in Marksville was suddenly filled with news that fish were falling from the sky. As noted in a previous column, a Dept. of Wildlife Fisheries biologist noted, “In an 80,000 square foot area, thousands of native freshwater fish, landed on Main and Monroe Streets. They fell in intervals, hitting roofs and back … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 17, 2013

It’s harvest time in South Louisiana for sugar cane and soy beans. Farmers in Arkansas are struggling with a menacing weed that is compromising the cotton crop. As noted in a previous column, “Pig Weed” is dominating many fields. Pesticide applications that originally controlled the weed are ineffective. Experts officially declared it uncontrollable as it chokes a million … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 16, 2013

On Oct. 15, 1907, Nicaraguan rebel forces, under the leadership of General Pablo Castilliano, attempted to overthrow the government. With an abundance of money, weapons and expertise, the government forces were repeatedly beaten by the rebels and were on the verge of surrendering. Camped along a ridge overlooking their enemy, the rebels prepared for a daybreak assault to … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 15, 2013

I just returned from Baltimore, expecting changes in their fall foliage. New England is second to none and attracts a vast amount of leaf peepers. Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts are the top states for changing leaves. Rhode Island, the smallest, measures about 30 miles across ,with Connecticut the third smallest. Balanced precipitation and consistent … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sunday, August 11, 2013

Our weekend thundershowers triggered reminders of a childhood event. Prior to a strong thunderstorm, we would stash makeshift battleships and destroyers either in or outside the garage. A couple of pieces of two-by-fours replicated the hull of the ship, and by nailing additional scrap pieces to the hull we were able to replicate the needed vessel. Ten-penny nails … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton for Friday, Aug. 9, 2013

Today’s showers and thunderstorms may help in lowering the expected daytime high by 17 degrees. This will occur only if the showers last longer than 20 minutes. High humidity makes the body work harder to cool itself by its own evaporation cooler, better known as sweat. One of the first signs of dehydration is an … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton for Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013

Events on this date include 16 deaths from flooding in Manila in 2012. In 1993, Tropical Storm Bret hit Venezuela, with 100 casualties. In 1922, the red-hot Pittsburgh Pirates recorded 46 hits in a double-header against the Phillies, and in 2001, the artificial turf at a Phillies game reached 149 degrees and 24 fans were … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton for Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013

On Tuesday morning, the National Weather Service issued a heat advisory for 23 parishes and eight Mississippi counties. The advisory prepares the public for a combination of high temperatures and high humidity that could create heat-related illnesses. Residents are urged to reduce sun exposure, take frequent breaks, stay hydrated and check on the elderly. As … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton for Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013

If you can stand the heat and high humidity for 47 days, relief is in sight. I’ve targeted mid-September as a time for temperature and humidity changes. Studies suggest increased heat can increase aggression. The Heat Island Effect is caused by higher populations, increased construction and rising energy consumption, resulting in temperature increases by 15 degrees at … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton for Monday, Aug. 5, 2013

Sunday’s column noted how the turkey vulture avoids overheating. Nature provided the black-tailed jackrabbit with a means of also keeping cool. Easily identified by its oversize ears, these trademark appendages increase the hare’s audio range to avoid predators. Due to the abundance of blood vessels, its 7-inch ears also act as a cooling mechanism that dissipates heat … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton for Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013

Friday’s column described “winter count,” whereby Native Americans chronicled the winter season. As noted, many tribes went into hibernation during the harsh winters and sketched images that also included battles, deaths of leaders and extreme climate conditions. Some of the winter count entries date to 1686, where John K. Bear noted “ice all over the land.” … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton for Friday, Aug. 2, 2013

The term “winter count” comes from the Lakota or Sioux tribe’s terms “waniyetu,” referring to the season of winter and “wowapi,” referring to anything noted, counted or read. The Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society archived that as early as the 17th century, Plains Indian groups kept pictographic calendrical winter counts. It is assumed during the harsh … Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton for Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Weatherwise magazine posted an article on the most populous city in the United States. New York City is in an area where atmospheric forces clash, including Canadian arctic air masses and the warm Gulf Stream current flowing northward along the Atlantic Seaboard. New Yorkers enjoy and despise a variety of weather patterns from tranquil … Continue reading →