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Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for March 2, 2015

Spring “springs” in 18 days as folks attend to their lawns, gardens and flower beds. The Farmer’s Almanac and publications from LSU’s Agriculture Department provide guidance. Some gardeners attest to the importance of the moon phases in plant growth. Every 28 days our moon advances through four phases: new moon, first quarter, full moon and the dark of… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 27, 2015

Japan was spared from the Mongolians of Genghis Khan by a typhoon that destroyed Khan’s army. It was named “Kamikaze,” after the god of wind, Shinto. As noted in a previous column, as the typhoon saved their ancestors, the Japanese Army in 1937 revived the name during World War II, believing they would be saved in battle. In… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 26, 2015

I’ll update the unofficial weather dictionary with the following items. “Brincles” are underwater icicles. Fire rainbows form when light reflects from ice crystals in high level clouds while white rainbows form in fog, rather than rain. You may have seen fire whirls. They form when intense heat and turbulent wind combine. The Catatumbo River is located in Venezuela… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 25, 2015

Thousands visit the Galleria dell’ Academia in Florence, Italy each year. They view the 17-foot-tall masterpiece of Michaelangelo Buonarroti’s biblical shepherd, known as David. Over the years, weather has advanced the aging of the 506 year-old statue. In 1512, lightning struck its base and in 1527 the left arm was broken during riots against Florence’s ruling Medici family.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 24, 2015

In Ireland; “if you see the mountains, it’s about to rain, if you can’t– it’s raining.” Ivar Quigley, is recognized as a champion turf cutter and often “cut the turf.” He would then set it aside to dry in the warm sun as the dry peat is later used as a heat source. Within… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 23, 2015

In Ireland; “if you see the mountains, it’s about to rain, if you can’t– it’s raining.” Ivar Quigley, is recognized as a champion turf cutter and often “cut the turf.” He would then set it aside to dry in the warm sun as the dry peat is later used as a heat source. Within… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 22, 2015

May 6, 1937, marked the end of rigid airships, when the Hindenburg exploded at Lakehurst, N.J. In February, 1935, the USS Macon completed a training mission near the Santa Barbara Islands in California. South of Point Sur, it experienced squally weather and attempted to avoid a developing storm. Lt. Commander Herbert Wiley ordered a maneuver when… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton for Feb. 21, 2015

Josh Eachus posted a report recently on evidence related to a cold and cold weather. Researchers believe a modest chill is good for your vascular system. Mom relied on mustard plasters, Vick's Vapo Rub and salt-water gargling to relive symptoms. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases verify Josh's report that drastic changes in temperature… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 20, 2015

During episodes of hurricanes we may experience the sound of a transformer exploding, loud enough to gain attention. Middle Tennessee residents experienced episodes of loud booms and explosions Wednesday evening. Police and news stations fielded reports from Ashland City, Hermitage, Hohenwald and Nolensville where residents experienced noises that resembled 4th of July cannon fire. Years ago these booms… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 19, 2015

During my stint with the NBC affiliate in Pittsburgh, Pa., I created a graphic that identified the number of days without sunshine. If my memory serves me, I believe we logged 53 consecutive days in the clouds. Wintertime diversions included constant trips to the Seven Springs ski resort in addition to other locations for sledding. As you are… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton for Feb. 14, 2015

. Recently, I referenced efforts to keep warm with a coal furnace. Homes built in the 1900s had limited insulation. Even though the coal furnace was stoked overnight, it didn't emit enough heat when the temperature slipped to minus-5 at daybreak. The remedy was bricks, heated near a fireplace and wrapped in a towel. Some… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 12, 2015

An area between Hawaii and California has been dubbed the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. The American Institute of Physics reports that researchers have identified five dirty patches in this region. They are located in the middle of large circular currents that attract garbage from other sections of the oceans. Scientists from the University of New South Wales in… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 11, 2015

The world’s largest solar plant is open and on-line in the California desert. The 550-megawatt solar project is located in Desert Center, California, adjacent to the Joshua Tree National Park. Constructed by First Solar, it cranks-out enough electricity to power 160,000 average homes. The project received a federal loan of $1.5 billion with critics posting reminders of the… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 10, 2015

In February, 1971, Edwin Robinson of Falmouth, Maine, jackknifed his truck on an icy overpass. He suffered severe damage to the occipital area of his brain and gradually lost his eyesight. With his hearing also impaired, for the next nine years, he learned Braille. While in his yard on June 4, 1980, he attempted to “cluck” his pet… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 9, 2015

In the “early” days, taverns and public houses or pubs provided lodging from inclement weather along with food and drink. As noted in a previous column, libations were also a convenient means of combating the chill and a “wee nip” could break the bone-chilling cold. For politicians, a journey was tedious as they would order their assistants… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 8, 2015

Yorkshire pudding is made with eggs, flour and milk. The batter is whipped or blended and placed on greased pans that many years ago were lined with suet. Suet is beef or mutton fat that collects around the loins and kidneys. My Dad was a butcher, and in January Mom would request portions of suet for birds… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 7, 2015

John Jackson keeps us updated on all aspects of fishing as our outdoor expert. At this time of year, Johnny wants to head north for fishing. On Lake Mille Lacs in northern Minnesota, anglers drag fully equipped, 4-ton houses onto the lake. Resting on 2-foot thick ice, these generator-powered, $25,000 homes include carpet, parquet floors, microwaves, surround-sound… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 5, 2015

John Jeffreis was a Boston physician, scientist, and military surgeon with the British Army during the Revolutionary War. He is recognized as the first “weatherman.” As an early balloonist, he accompanied Jean-Pierre Blanchard in 1785 by crossing the English Channel in a balloon. During the flight, Jeffries took readings with a thermometer, barometer and measured humidity with a… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 4, 2015

Punxatawney Phil is not alone. It’s the ploughing season in Thailand and the opening ceremony includes two oxen to determine the harvest. In front of the decorated oxen are rice, beans, alcohol, sesame seeds and corn. What is most selected by the beasts determines the yield. Consuming more sesame seeds or corn means bad weather while other selections… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 3, 2015

November was colder than December and colder than January. Welcome to February and the heart of the Winter season. November 14, 15, and 18 included overnight lows at 29 degrees. November 19th was the coldest at 27 with 31 degrees on the 26th. December 25th was the only date where the overnight low dipped to 32 degrees. January… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Feb. 2, 2015

Punxsutawney is the Native American name for “ponksad-uteney,” or “town of sand flies.” The Delaware Indians considered groundhogs honorable ancestors. The Pennsylvania Dutch advanced the folklore. You’ll hear the results of Phil’s experience this morning as he is “extracted” from sleep, held before the crowd and then asked to make a prediction based upon his shadow. In 2006,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton weather news for Feb. 1, 2015

George Seaman raised Beagle dogs for rabbit hunting in Pennsylvania. As noted in a previous column, George designed an enclosed, elevated pen with enclosures and an open area where the dogs could “do their business.” The meshed pen allowed the droppings to fall to the ground below. Our snowball battles stretched between the Minnet and Sudano… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 31, 2015

Friday’s column shared the wintry weather in Erie, Pa. Gannon University was located adjacent to the lake on Perry Square. Our fraternity house was blocks away from campus. Visiting with my frat brothers Pete Fresina, Dennis Noble, Swede Carlson, Ernie DeSantis, Jim Suppa, “Bullwhip” Wilkins, Eddie Engelmire, Rick Moran and Tony Pasquale, I remembered grasping the… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 29, 2015

Coastal homes in the Northeast are coated with ice from Tuesday’s monster storm. Sea water contains dissolved salts, proteins, fats and dead algae, and is laced with organic matter and sea creature excrement. Shaking seawater in a beaker causes surface bubbles and foam. This is replicated when the ocean is agitated from wind and waves.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 27, 2015

In addition to the winter storm warning a hurricane force wind warning is posted for the northeast. Ampurdan is located in northeastern Spain where intense winds blow from the Pyrenees. High pressure downslopes air through mountain passes and is rapidly warmed by compression. As noted in a previous column, these winds fascinated artist Salvado Dali and believed they… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 26, 2015

Yesterday’s column furthered memories of sled-riding. It was all “down-hill” with a sled, toboggan, aluminum saucer or garbage can lid. Overnight, Nicky Sadano would coat the trail with water, creating an ice layer that increased speed, but perturbed drivers attempting to get up-the-hill. After the big snow it was meltdown time; turning the powder to squishy snow, perfect… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 24, 2015

Miriam Johnson was our piano teacher, and her three worst students were me and my brothers Denis and Michael. As we were more interested in sports than classical music, it was a challenge for Mom to ensure that daily practices were completed. As noted in a previous column, Saturday morning’s lesson began with a mile walk… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 23, 2015

Extreme blizzard conditions where blowing and falling snow reduces visibilities to the point where the sky and the ground appear totally white is a whiteout. New Mexico and portions of Texas experienced these conditions Thursday. One of the fiercest blizzards occurring in the world is the purga or poorga that rolls across northern Siberia. With below zero temperatures,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 21, 2015

An elderly lady from Gonzales left a voice-message believing that her eyes deceived her. She noted, “There’s a rainbow against the Sun!” She continued, “I need to know what this is, I thought that maybe I cracked!” What she experienced Monday was a halo or sundog. Ice crystals in the upper atmosphere act as prisms and when sunlight,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 20, 2015

Mesoscale eddies are spinning bodies of water that grow as large as 500 kilometers in diameter. These eddies can also exist from days to months before being absorbed into surrounding water. Scientists at the University of Hawaii reviewed satellite data from 1992 through 2010. Their research matched the data with floating sensors that identified the eddies by their… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 20, 2015

Mesoscale eddies are spinning bodies of water that grow as large as 500 kilometers in diameter. These eddies can also exist from days to months before being absorbed into surrounding water. Scientists at the University of Hawaii reviewed satellite data from 1992 through 2010. Their research matched the data with floating sensors that identified the eddies by their… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 14, 2015

The Atacama Desert is located in the upper reaches of Chile in South America. The desert extends from the Peruvian border to the town of Copiapo. To the west is the Pacific Ocean and to the east, the high central Andes, spanning 100 miles at its widest section. As noted in a previous column, the yearly precipitation amounts… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 13, 2015

The Aurora Borealis is never witnessed in south Louisiana but is often viewed in northern regions. Also known as Northern Lights, highly charged electrons from solar wind interact with a variety of atmospheric elements, including gas and dust. These particles, at various levels of the atmosphere, create the spectacular colors of the Aurora Borealis. Tonight at the Louisiana… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 12, 2015

Years ago, plane de-icing was randomly performed when conditions warranted and is now a regimented procedure. On this date in 1982, Air Florida Flight 90 crashed into the icy Potomac River, thirty seconds after takeoff from National Airport in Arlington, Virginia. The casualty count noted 78 deaths, including four who were in cars on the 14th… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 11, 2015

Today marks the anniversary of “America’s most fascinating and surreal disaster.” As noted in a previous column, on Jan. 11, 1919, Boston’s Daily Globe reported that “A cold air mass settled in.” The following morning, the mercury tumbled from 36 degrees to 20 at 2 p.m to 7 degrees at 10 p.m.; then 2 degrees. Crews… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 10, 2015

Friday morning offered another example of winter weather preparations. In addition to the household tasks of protecting vegetation, pets and pipes, transportation authorities prepared for episodes of icing and glazing. Referring to pets, during our younger years, an expected blast of Canadian air meant that our “outside” dog, Pooch, was permitted to spend the cold evenings in… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 9, 2015

There could be episodes of blizzards as we advance through the Winter season. “Blizzard” originally meant “a stunning blow,” often referred to a boxer’s knockout punch. Davy Crockett, no relation to Jennifer, used the word in reference to a barrage of rifle shot as a deer to “taking a blizzard” to his prey. As noted in a previous… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 8, 2015

The Department of Defense originated the Heat Advisory Index and the Wind Chill Index. How exposed reacts in high humidity and high heat causes bodily complications. Very cold temperatures and increased wind speeds also create hypothermic complications. Our daytime high today won’t reach 50 degrees and the last time that occurred was on February 11th and 12th, 2014.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 6, 2015

The Heartland Institute’s Mission is to discover, develop, and promote free-market solutions to social and economic problems. The Health Board of Brown County, WI, reviewed research and declared that wind turbines are a “human health hazard.” Local residents report that noise frequency from Duke Energy turbines at the Shirley Wind Farm are causing ear pain, nausea, headaches,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 5, 2015

Tonight’s full moon rises at 6:06 and with clear skies, astronomers will enjoy good viewing. Native Americans referred to this moon as the Full Cold Moon. A full Moon, reflecting off a snow surface, increases “moonlight.” As noted in a previous column, Parade Magazine’s columnist, David Levy, filed an article, “Why We Have A Moon.” Levy took… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 4, 2016

In South Louisiana, car-hopping occurred at Hopper’s or Sonic as “car hops” delivered the burgers, fries and shakes. Car hopping in Pennsylvania occurred after a heavy snow. Our favorite jump-on spot was Pete Pavlovic’s Store. With a half-foot of snow on Brighton Road and without traction, cars would spin across the icy, snow-covered road, struggling to… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 3, 2015

As noted in a previous column, the Sause boys, Mike and Kit, attended the Ohio State-Michigan blizzard in the 1950s. Thursday’s Sugar Bowl game reminded me of Jan. 1, 2002, when LSU played Illinois. Tiger fans packed the Super Dome on a cloudy, cold day. Rain changed to sleet, then flurries. At the end of the game,… Continue reading →