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Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 24, 2014

It originated as a day to give thanks for the harvest, to embrace relationships between family and friends and an invitation to neighbors. As noted in a previous column, original traditions included the wild turkey and the pumpkin pie. Long before the arrival of pilgrims, pumpkins were used as a food source, for medicinal purposes and even pounded,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 23, 2014

Turkey and weather complement Thanksgiving. Back in the old college days we would load as many guys into a car as possible for the trek home. At Gannon University, Marty DeRose was the wheel man, transporting fraternity brothers to Meadville, Ellwood City and Beaver Falls, Pa. We left Erie on Wednesday afternoon in 1968 with clouds… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 22, 2014

From 1979 through 1981, I commuted to Pittsburgh from Baton Rouge every week. I returned home to showcase the weather on WPXI, the NBC affiliate. My wife, Mabyn, remained at home here in Baton Rouge. On one Monday morning I landed in Pittsburgh with snow falling at a rapid rate. By the time I reached my… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 19, 2014

When Thomas Jefferson was Governor of Virginia, he designated 60 acres of land in Bourbon County, Kentucky for farming. Pioneers were instructed to build a permanent structure to raise, store and export “native corn.” Corn was too perishable and bulky for transporting. Families consumed limited amounts of it so ingenious farmer’s utilized Kentucky’s resources of water, climate and… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 18, 2014

During the very early days of air travel, unidentified flying objects were not referenced when folks looked to the skies. On November 17, 1896, hundreds in Sacramento watched three lights, illuminating a dark and stormy sky. The unusual object traveled 350 yards as it skirted rooftops. Five days later the object took a half-hour to cross another town… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 17, 2014

Sunday’s column recognized mistakes that should be avoided during winter. Some were more appropriate for other locales that include selecting a snow shovel that will reduce stress on your spine. Stretching before shoveling is also suggested. Using an electric heater to thaw frozen pipes could lead to electrocution. Applying heat with a hair dryer from the faucet to… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 16, 2014

Two consecutive days of frigid weather, including a record low, found the weather team extending preparation suggestions. Ours include protecting plants, warming up the pets and visiting the elderly. Pipe protection can be initiated for future cold snaps. The Weather Channel provided suggestions on 20 mistakes you should avoid during winter. Some include pouring hot water on… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 15, 2014

It’s opening day of duck season for the Coast and West zones. Luke Guarisco holds the title as champion duck caller for the Avoca and Pecan Island duck clubs. Along with the “Duck Dynasty” stars Austin McCullough and Hayes Alexander, Luke judges callers. Geese fly in a “V” formation to provide 80 percent greater range than… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 13, 2014

With the sugar cane harvest completed, the production of molasses will continue. The Mancivalano family operates the Adams Farm in southern Vermont. Since 1865 the farm has included a dairy, timber production and the construction of sap tanks. The mainstay of the farm is its production of maple syrup. Ideal tree tapping includes cold nights and 50-degree days… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 10, 2014

For cattle and sheep ranchers a “stocking rate” reflects how many animals a designated area of acreage will support. The USDA/Agricultural Research Center noted the unpredictability of precipitation causes difficulty for ranchers in the Great Plains to estimate this rate. Scientists use a computer model to assist. By extrapolating seasonal weather predictions, models test scenarios… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 9, 2014

Porches were originally designed to provide space for folks to pause before entering or exiting a home or building. As noted in a previous column, porches in England provided cover for worshippers and for liturgical use. Before a baptism, the priest would begin the service on the porch. In medieval times, a room was added above the porch… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 8, 2014

Growing-up in the northeast, college football games were always played in the afternoon. We followed Pitt, Penn State and especially Notre Dame, where my brother Mike enrolled and local football stars Terry Hanratty and Chuck Landolfi played. Similar to Baton Rouge, football games were limited to just three network channels, so the power of WWL put us… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 7, 2014

On this date in 1940, 35 m.p.h. winds caused a bridge collapse. The city was Tacoma, WA and the structure spanned the Narrows River. Following the official opening, excessive vibration put the bridge into the water. It was thereafter called “Galloping Gertie,” and due to its design and lack of environmental consideration, it was permanently placed into the… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 6, 2014

Moonrise tonight will be at 5:20 pm. This full moon was referenced by Native Americans as the “Full Beaver Moon.” “Honeymoon” dates back to the 1500s when newlyweds enjoyed the fullness of the period after their marriage. Once settled, it was presumed that the experience would wane, similar to a waning moon. Four years ago Erika… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 4, 2014

In 1907 the Italian Royal Academy of Sciences noted that tests of anti-hail cannons weren’t effective and were expensive and useless. By the early twentieth century, anti-hail cannons disappeared. Replacing the cannons were anti-hail rockets that would explode 800 grams of dynamite, above the ground, to prevent hail formation. These explosions caused cold core eddies that surround hail,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 2, 2014

Here’s a few items of interest. Certain species of migratory birds, fish and insects can sense the Earth’s magnetic field and use magnetsome cells in their brains to orient themselves and navigate during migration. In Egypt, visitors breathing inside the great pyramid Chephren at Giza are contributing to its destruction. About 0.7 ounces of water vapor is… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 2, 2014

We said goodbye to Daylight-Saving Time this morning, also referred to as “summer time” in many areas of the world. Daylight-Saving-Time makes the sun “set” one hour later and reduces the period between sunset and bedtime by one hour. The idea was first mentioned by Benjamin Franklin in 1784 and was first advocated by London builder… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 1, 2014

Some believe weather changes create additional cold and allergy symptoms. Our grandfather professed this, and on his nightstand would place a bowl of apples, onions and garlic -- laced with whiskey -- when he experienced chest congestion. As noted in a previous column, mom would send us to school with Vick’s Vapor Rub piled on our chests… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 31, 2014

More than 50 years ago, cold, rain or snow never cancelled our Halloween. As noted in previous columns, gardens in the neighborhood found lingering corn stalks with an ear or two. The gravel-like kernels were twisted from the cob and separated into paper bags. When the shucking ended a prank was underway-for some. Me and my brothers Denis… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 30, 2014

On this date in 2012, New Jersey residents were experiencing the devastation of Superstorm Sandy. In 1991, another storm, referred to as the Halloween Storm, lashed the North Carolina coast for five days. Hurricane-force winds pounded New England and New Jersey causing the highest tides on the Eastern Seaboard since the Great Atlantic Hurricane of ‘44. As noted… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 27, 2014

Sunday’s column noted the origin of the term “threshold.” The origin of this food stuff recognizes a slab of bacon as a sign of a wealthy man who “could really bring home the bacon.” As noted in a previous column, sharing the bacon led to guests “chewing the fat.” The wealthy had plates of pewter while the… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton ‘s Weather News for Oct. 26, 2014

Our daily bath or shower is routine, but that was not the case years ago when the “man of the house” enjoyed the privilege of clean water for his bath. As noted in a previous column, Dad’s “scrub-up” was followed by the other sons, then the women and finally the babies. The dirty water posed a… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 25, 2014

A hoedown is a dance or traditional fiddle tunes. Octobers in high school included the Varsity “R” Hoedown, a fundraiser for the athletic teams that included food, music and cider drinking competitions. One contestant spilled a mug of cider. As my brother Mike cleaned the mess, Bobo Tincani stepped into the cider puddle. Mike told him… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 24, 2014

On Oct. 23, 1947, a cafe in Marksville was suddenly filled with news that fish were falling from the sky. As noted in an archived column, a biologist for the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries provided the following account. “In an 80,000-square-foot area, thousands of freshwater fish, native to local waters, were landing on Main and Monroe… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 22, 2014

Luigi Bombicci, a mineralogist from Bologna, Italy, believed that hail could be prevented. In 1880, his theory of “spherohedron” described the hailstone’s process of crystallization and preventing hail development with sound. In 1896, Albert Steiger, mayor of Windisch-Feistritz, Austria, made the first attempt to defeat hail with the force of sound and did so by using… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 21, 2014

It’s not unusual for those that reside in the northern extremes and the northeast to experience snowfall at this time of the year. The “changing leaves” were somewhat deterred this year as maples and cottonwoods still offer beautiful displays. Also at this time of the year, forecasts may include a “snow loading alert.” This is especially pertinent to… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 20, 2014

In other sections of the United States it is not unusual for a winter weather alert to be issued at this time of the year and many locations are also awaiting their first frost. An extended period of dry, warm days, following a frost,` is common and as noted in a previous column, this describes Indian summer. In… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 19, 2014

Weather anniversaries for Oct. 19 include Hurricane Wilma, blasting the Yucatan with 175 mile-per-hour winds nine years ago. Katrina, Rita, Wilma were among the five most intense Atlantic hurricanes, rewriting the record book in other categories. Wilma’s eye wall was two nautical miles wide, the smallest on record. Louisiana has also experienced episodes of earthquakes. On… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 18, 2014

Previous columns have noted Ben Franklin’s expertise as an inventor, including his lightning experiments. Franklin was inspired by other inventors, especially French academic Thomas Dalibard, who actually performed the first lightning experiment. Franklin wanted to duplicate Dalibard’s experiment and did so from Philadelphia’s Christ Church on Oct. 19, 1752. According to his diary, Franklin made a… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 17, 2014

King John “Lackland,” King Henry’s II’s favorite son, got his nickname because his father had no land to give him. As noted in a previous column, John, the younger brother of King Richard the Lionhearted, tried to overthrow his brother. Returning from the Crusades in 1194, he forgave his brother but John was condemned by barons because of… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 16, 2014

On October 15, 1907, Nicaraguan rebel forces, under the leadership of Gen. Pablo Castilliano, were attempting to overthrow the government. As noted in a previous column, with money, weapons and expertise, government forces were repeatedly beaten by the rebels and on the verge of surrendering. Camped along a ridge overlooking their enemy, the rebels prepared for a final… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 15, 2014

By Oct. 27 the World Series will include either the Giants, Cardinals, Orioles or Royals. After Pearl Harbor in 1941, the Office of Censorship advised radio stations to omit mentions of weather. It was a voluntary “code” as station managers feared compromising their licenses. Newspapers could only publish the previous day’s highs and lows for no… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 14, 2014

After a return to August-like weather a well organized cold front blasted through our state on Monday. Wind damage and investigated reports of tornadoes will be validated today. The destructive nature of this front is also providing a few benefits this week. We’re fortunately sliding out of the upper and mid 80s to temperatures in the mid 70s… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 13, 2014

On October 13, 1917, 70,000 people gathered at Fatima, Portugal, to witness a miracle. They testified that the sun became detached from the sky, rolling right and left as if it were falling upon the earth. Lucia Santos and her two cousins Francisco and Jacinta Marto testified that five months earlier the Virgin Mary appeared to… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 12, 2014

On the heels of Typhoon Phanfone, Vongfong, meaning “the wasp,” will impact Japan. The most intense storm to hit the Pacific Northwest started from the remnants of Typhoon Freda that formed on Oct. 3, 1962. Three successive storms hit the Pacific Northwest over a 30-hour period from Oct. 11-12, 1962. The first postponed the sixth… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 10, 2014

Krypton was bothersome to Superman but is beneficial to scientists. A commonly used method of calculating ancient ice age better understands Earth’s climate and past ice ages. For years, carbon dating compared the decay of a radioactive isotope to that of a stable isotope. Carbon -14 is produced by cosmic rays in the ice, providing dating to 50,000… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 9, 2014

Years ago, kids “missing” school at the start of deer season, in Western Pennsylvania, initiated a “day-off.” Many school districts prevent make-up days by planning for snow events. Schools in Mississippi and Alabama have tornado days in place. The deadly tornado that hit Moore, Oklahoma in 2013, took 24 lives, including nine children. Officials in Oklahoma are continuing… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 8, 2014

Earth Gauge suggests that highs, lows and frontal passages compliment the movement of migratory birds. The best time for bird watchers is the day after a cold front passes providing northerly winds, dropping temperatures, rising air pressure and clearing skies. The website eBird offers tips for viewing migratory birds and weather with weekly regional migration forecasts and tips… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 6, 2014

Mobile food canteens have become popular in the Baton Rouge area and have caused problems in China. Smoke from the barbecue stands are a common source of unhealthy airborne particulate matter known as PM2.5. A spokesman from Beijing’s Bureau of City Administration and Law Enforcement insists the “stands” not only create serious air pollution but enhance noise pollution… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 5, 2014

Saturday’s column reviewed the successful prediction of Stephen Saxby on Oct. 4, 1869. It was called Saxby’s Gale and was based on the position of the moon relative to the Earth. Storm season is underway for the Canadian Maritimes and coastal sections of the northeast. Storms are predicted by the climatology of the region, Saxby’s scenario… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 4, 2014

George Washington carried one, and Mark Twain wrote of a “real Barlow” in “Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn” in 1876. A Barlow is classified as a penknife, however original penknives didn’t have folding blades, resembling a scalpel and designed to thin and point writing instruments known as quills. Both knives were used for whittling which is… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 3, 2014

Our seasonal changes can change our relaxation time to chore time. Tasks include checking the air conditioning units in the spring to keep them humming throughout the summer. Furnace tune-ups prevent problems during the super-cold days. One of the traditions when we were kids was the autumn chore known as “changing out the screens.” Sixteen windows… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 2, 2014

With 59 days left in Hurricane Season 2014, historically, October was a vulnerable month for destructive tropical systems. Hurricane Hilda on October 3, 1964 killed 16 Louisiana residents and after moving inland, tornadoes killed 22 more in LaRose. In 1999, October hurricanes: Mitch, Joyce, Keith, and Irene caused extensive damage. Opal came on the heels of Elena causing… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 1, 2014

Weed pulling is a year-round chore in South Louisiana. “The vine that ate the South” is the kudzu plant, native to Asia and introduced to the United States in the 19th century. As noted in a previous column, the vine was classified as a pest weed by the Department of Agriculture 50 years ago. In addition… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 30, 2014

Years ago, manual weather readings were conducted at the Baton Rouge Weather Service Office. This exercise constituted data collection from instrumentation and other observations. For the last 118 years, an observer has recorded daily temperature readings and observations at a remote location and nature area, 90 miles north of New York City. The Montauk Preserve weather station… Continue reading →