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A map listing homicides or suspected homicides in EBR Parish.
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Current gas prices in BR area.

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 1, 2014

Weed pulling is a year-round chore in South Louisiana. “The vine that ate the South” is the kudzu plant, native to Asia and introduced to the United States in the 19th century. As noted in a previous column, the vine was classified as a pest weed by the Department of Agriculture 50 years ago. In addition… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 30, 2014

Years ago, manual weather readings were conducted at the Baton Rouge Weather Service Office. This exercise constituted data collection from instrumentation and other observations. For the last 118 years, an observer has recorded daily temperature readings and observations at a remote location and nature area, 90 miles north of New York City. The Montauk Preserve weather station… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton Weather News for Sept. 28, 2014

The apple harvest is underway in northern orchards. Our backyard provided a good crop for everyone. Mom secured enough produce to “put up” apple sauce, apple butter and freezer apples for pies and cobblers. To complement refrigeration a basement or spring house provided a “climate-controlled” environment for turnips, potatoes, carrots, peaches and apples. Another location… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 27, 2014

George Washington carried one, and Mark Twain wrote of a “real Barlow” in “Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn” in 1876. A Barlow is classified as a penknife, however original penknives didn’t have folding blades. It resembled a scalpel and was designed to thin and point writing instruments known as quills. Both knives were used for whittling,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 26, 2014

In response to yesterday’s column, a reader questioned the lack of acorns on her street and sidewalk as compared to four years ago. The amount of nuts on the ground then could have been attributed to Hurricane Isaac. There appears to be evidence that additional acorns may identify an approaching cold season. During my exercise run,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 24, 2014

On the morning of Saturday, Sept. 24, 2005 at 2:38, Hurricane Rita made landfall at Johnson’s Bayou in Cameron Parish. The Category Three Hurricane posted winds that made it the fourth most intense Atlantic hurricane. Rita followed Katrina, causing damage in two cities on each end of our state. My column from September 23, 2005 noted, “For the… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 23, 2014

Now that it’s Autumn, folks in the Northeast will enjoy the changing-of-the-leaves. Each leaf contains anthocyanins that act like a sunscreen and once the chlorophyll breaks down, photosynthesis slows This process retards the absorption of light and excess light damages the leaves. Researchers determined that nutrient-poor leaves, low in nitrogen, causes the intense red color of sugar maple… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 22, 2014

At 9:29 tonight, the Sun slides across the equator, initiating the autumnal equinox. Before the designation of seasons, cultures recognized seasons as either rainy or dry. Others recognized them as growing, harvesting and winter, while others have marked ten or more seasons. The designation of four seasons has a definitive beginning and end with key moments when the… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 20, 2014

Recent wet weather has slightly delayed our sugarcane harvest. The purchase of the “deep-freezer” by my dad in the 1960s became a storage locker for the fruits and vegetables from our garden in Ellwood City, Pa. As noted in a previous column, fruit trees included apple, pear, peach, plum and a grape arbor, producing enough fruit… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 19, 2014

Thursday’s column identified China as the most dammed country. Another dam builder is the beaver. Their dams, canals and lodges protect them from predators, provide a food source and building materials. When startled, beavers initiate an alarm on their quiet pools by energetically smacking the water with their broad tail; forwarding a danger message to others. Stockpiled sticks… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 18, 2014

China was the first to be named in 2007 and still leads that list as the most dammed nation in the world. The United States is second, followed by India, japan, Spain and Canada. In 140 countries, 47, 665 large dams exist. Scientists believe that the weight of their water alters the speed of the Earth’s rotation.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 17, 2014

On Sept. 16, 2010, Hurricanes Igor and Julia made it to Category 4 status. This marked the first time since September 16, 1926 that two Category 4 hurricanes existed in the Atlantic at the same time for just six hours. September 16, 1999 marked a day of unprecedented devastation for North Carolina. Hurricane Floyd unloaded 20 inches of… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 16, 2014

The Gulf water temperature is at its highest, conducive for tropical storm development. Researchers at the University of Miami have joined forces to achieve dual goals. Atmospheric scientists and marine biologists are predicting the severity of tropical storms and evaluating fish migration. Since 2001, one team has been tagging large pelagic fish such as tarpon, with satellite linked… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 13, 2014

This morning’s column looks back to 2005. Catholics recognized the birth of the Blessed Mother this past week. At noon mass on Sept. 7, 2005, Father Vic Messina delivered his homily duirng Hurricane Katrina’s aftermath. He referenced The Cathedral of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Biloxi and the foresight of its builders. It was… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 12, 2014

A refreshment expert recently suggested that climate change may be impacting popular refreshments. Extreme weather affects Coco-Cola’s supply of sugar cane, sugar beets and citrus fruits. On a related note, Nike shuttered factories in Thailand due to flooding. The New York Times reports that Jeffrey Seabright, Vice-President for environment and water resources for Coke, referenced events related to… Continue reading →

Needed water could be rationed

The current drought in the west took many by surprise and has now revealed the inadequacies of programs designed to distribute Colorado River water. The New York Times reports that this drought is now into its second decade and has shrunk the river and the reservoirs it feeds. Last June, officials cut back on water flowing from Lake… Continue reading →

The casket, the storm...

Sunday’s column noted the story of actor Charles Coughlin who died in 1899 during a performance in Galveston. Before his death a fortune teller forewarned of his demise in a southern city at the height of his career. As noted in a previous column, immediately after his burial the Hurricane of 1899 hit Galveston, sending his casket into… Continue reading →

A casket for openers

Bagpiper, casket and vault peddler, Banjo Bob Cargo, noted that if I post this story, free bagpipe lessons. In 1899, classical actor Charles Coughlin, from Prince Edward Island, Canada, relocated to Galveston, against his family’s wishes. Before pursuing his career he consulted a fortune teller, forewarning that he would die at the height of his fame in a… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 6, 2014

Autumn begins in 16 days, the traditional launch of “The Farmer’s Almanac.” I’ve noted its predictions in recent columns. Robert B. Thomas started “The Old Farmer’s Almanac.” In 1818, David Young began this almanac by extrapolating a combination of lunar cycles, planet positions and sunspot maximums to create a weather formula for sections of the United States. Clothed… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 5, 2014

Thursday’s column reviewed the accuracy of the Farmer’s Almanac. The Almanac’s predictions for 2015 predict wetter-than-normal conditions for the Gulf Coast and Florida. Cold and unsettled weather is expected for November and December. Florida and the Carolinas will be “in the crosshairs” for tropical storms in late July with another threat for Florida in late August and the… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 4, 2014

Video coverage of tropical storms, hurricanes and damaging thunderstorms include the swinging and swaying of traffic lights. Hurricane video also offers swinging stoplights, dangling and crashing from the hurricane’s force. Wire and cable connected street lights are a thing-of-the-past in Baton Rouge. In the 1980s, Miami was the first city to install “Mast Arms.” When eight hurricanes hit… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 3, 2014

The 2015 Farmer’s Almanac reviewed its predictions made in July of 2014. Managing Editor, Sondra Duncan and Editor, Peter Geiger validated their winter predictions. They noted that the bitterly cold Winter seemed to have taken the long-range forecasters completely by surprise and referenced NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center advanced forecast predicting “above normal temperatures through January 2014 across 48… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 1, 2014

A Labor Day tradition was an invitation from Leonard “Dutch” Shultz. He had a backyard swimming pool and before episodes of Indian Summer, the day was usually hot. Guests contributed a variety of summertime recipes. Their adjacent yard provided additional space for related activities but the pool was the place-to-be. The Labor Day Party included a… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 31, 2014

The first day of school “way back when,” was the day after Labor Day. Our school year schedule didn’t include days-off for Mardi Gras and spring breaks. Like most families we subscribed to the traditions of new school clothes and lunch buckets. Before backpacks, an old belt transported our books for “night work” -- better known… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 29, 2014

The column today includes an excerpt, presented nine years ago on this date and Katrina’s landfall. “After 48 hours of on-air coverage of Katrina, this devastating, catastrophic storm, some comments. In every hurricane conference attended, the New Orleans “model” has occurred. The worst-case scenario Monday morning mirrored expectations of the Hurricane Center in Miami. Numerous storms have… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 28, 2014

Residents of LaPlace remember this date in 2012. Four storms have impacted the Baton Rouge area. Andrew in 1992 shut down our city and Katrina’s devastation transported thousands of folks to Baton Rouge. Gustav was the worst storm to hit the city and is known as the hurricane that toppled more trees than any other in history. Six… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 27, 2014

We’ll watch three areas, one in the Gulf and two systems in the Atlantic. The months August and September hold the distinction as the worst months for hurricanes and tropical storms for Louisiana. On August 26, 1992, Hurricane Andrew made landfall 20 miles southwest of Morgan City. It ranked number 4 as the most intense land falling United… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 26, 2014

With access to a variety of weather resources, opinions are easily advanced via social media. Observers can access radar, satellites and forecast models, putting them in the eye of the storm from their home. In 1977, while at the “other” station, my friend and co-worker, Grey Hammett, retrieved four-hour-old satellite pictures from the National Weather Service Office in… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 25, 2014

Before Katrina, Hurricane Andrew was the costliest hurricane in U.S. history. On this date, two years ago, we were tracking Tropical Storm Isaac. Gustav was the worst storm to hit Baton Rouge. Andrew recorded five official landfalls including its final landing as a category 3 storm on our coast. Storms that cause extensive destruction are sealed in our… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 24, 2014

On a visit to Las Vegas in 2012, we enjoyed an excursion to the Hoover or Boulder Dam and Lake Mead. Hydrologists report that 63 trillion gallons of ground water have been lost in the West due to drought. Lake Mead is at its lowest level since the Hoover Dam was constructed in the 1930s.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 23, 2014

Once a lot is selected, the positioning of the house is determined by the prevailing wind. My grandfather stationed our Pennsylvania house in relationship to the prevailing north wind. Built in the early 1900s, his house had the front door facing west and the back door facing east. The north and south sides bore the brunt of… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 22, 2014

I have used the word “Tabascoey” as another adjective for our summertime weather. A few years ago I received a call from a gentleman questioning permission to use “Tabascoey” in my weather forecasts and this column. After numerous barbs, jokes and kidding, he identified himself as the late Paul McIlhenney from the McIlhenny family of New Iberia and… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 21, 2014

Furthering Tuesday’s column when Dutch explorer Adrian Block described an unusually large white oak growing in a clearing on what is now Hartford, Connecticut. In the 1930s, a delegation of Native Americans approached the property’s owner where the tree was located. Intending to remove the tree, Samuel Wyllys preserved it because it was planted ceremonially for the sake… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 20, 2014

The Hurricane Center in Miami could be identifying a tropical depression today or tomorrow. Many of our readers will remember this date. On August 20, 1969, clean-up from Hurricane Camille was underway. The storm caused flooding and mudslides in the James and York River basins in Virginia. Rainfall totals were 31 inches with 109 fatalities. On October 21,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 19, 2014

The village of Green Bank is nestled in the Allegheny Mountain Range and may be one of the quietest places on Earth. It’s the home of the Green Bank Telescope, operating under the auspices of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In 1958, the Federal Communications Commission created a 13,000-square-mile quiet zone to shield Green Bank’s radio telescopes from… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 18, 2014

Louisiana boasts 14 lighthouses, the oldest dating back to 1839. In August, 1789, the First Congress federalized existing lighthouses. Built by the colonists, funds were appropriated for lighthouses, beacons and buoys. As noted in a previous column, the lighthouse safely directed ships through episodes of fog and storms. Sound was used to guide ships and in… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 16, 2014

In May 2012, Gary Connery donned a wing suit and performed a 3,000 foot base jump onto 24,000 cardboard boxes in Henley Upon Thames for a world record. On July 25, 2012, Felix Baumgartner freefell for four minutes at 536 mph, opening his chute for the worlds highest skydive. On this date in 1960, Air Force… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 15, 2014

Baby powder isn’t just for the baby, especially at this time of the year. I shared this with our Sports Director, Mike Cauble, noting that many athletes use it before they suit up to reduce sweat and discomfort. I also told him I use the lavender, Johnson’s baby powder. He told me to, “Get Lost!” We did not… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 13, 2014

The Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean and Atlantic are quiet but on this date in 1766, a powerful hurricane leveled the tiny village of Trois-Islets on the island of Martinique. As noted, Joseph-Gaspard Tascher was one of the island’s wealthy planters and suffered total financial ruin from the devastating storm. In dire straits, he did what many attempted in… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 12, 2014

Weather oddities on this date include to men resting near a stream in the Tatra mountains, bordering Slovakia and Poland in 1927. Stones began falling from the sky, splashing the water and hitting their heads. Attempting to seek shelter in a nearby inn, they were “tossed out” as the inn keeper believed the devil followed them inside. In… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 8, 2014

Events on this date include Tropical Storm Bret, in 1993, hitting Venezuela with 100 casualties. In 1922, the improving Pittsburgh Pirates recorded 46 hits in a double-header against the Phillies and in 2001, the artificial turf at a Phillies game reached 149 degrees as 24 fans were treated for exhaustion. In 1963 the Kingsmen recorded “Louie-Louie.” In… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 6, 2014

In 1874, Robert Green operated a booth in Philadelphia. He ran out of ice, went to his friend’s ice cream booth and substituted ice cream for ice. His root beer “floated” the ice cream and a new treat was invented. Today is National Root Beer Float Day and when we were kids Hire’s Root Beer Extract was mixed… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 5, 2014

Expect episodes of lightning today. Around 300 A.D. a father was so enraged when his daughter converted to Christianity, he beheaded her. Following the decapitation he was killed by lightning. His daughter was anointed St. Barbara Dioscorus, patron saint of lightning victims. British military officer, Maj. R. Summerford, while on the battlefield in Flanders on February, 1918, was… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 4, 2014

In the Daly & Spraggs Drug Store in Waynesburg, PA, a customer told owner Byron Daly that it would rain on July 29th. Questioning how he knew, the customer responded that it always rained on his birthday – July 29th. Daly began wagering customers, not for cash but a hat. For 136 years, it rained in Waynesburg… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Aug. 3, 2014

As rainwater falls it is naturally soft. Entering the ground and into waterways, it gathers a variety of minerals, including chalk, lime, calcium and magnesium, transferring the water from soft to hard. These minerals also assist in providing taste and nutrition for our drinking water. Baton Rouge claims the second-best drinking water in the country. Years… Continue reading →