Pat Shingleton for Thursday, May 16, 2013

Recent lightning storms left a batch of nitrogen on our vegetation. An archived item from Nature Geoscience said scientists challenged a commonly held theory in 2011 about rainfall’s activity after reaching the ground. It was previously believed rainfall entering the soil would mix with additional “ensuing” rain until transportation into the plant. Oregon State University researchers determined rain is securely captured within plants until it is needed. Three years ago, the movement of rainfall was tracked through the Cascade Mountains and because of specific water signatures, researchers followed the rainfall from soil to small pores adjacent to the roots. These pores stored the rainfall until it was used in the transpiration process. The excess rainfall was diverted from the plants directly to nearby streams. Fastcast: Cloud mix, warm.