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Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 29, 2015

Coastal homes in the Northeast are coated with ice from Tuesday’s monster storm. Sea water contains dissolved salts, proteins, fats and dead algae, and is laced with organic matter and sea creature excrement. Shaking seawater in a beaker causes surface bubbles and foam. This is replicated when the ocean is agitated from wind and waves.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 27, 2015

In addition to the winter storm warning a hurricane force wind warning is posted for the northeast. Ampurdan is located in northeastern Spain where intense winds blow from the Pyrenees. High pressure downslopes air through mountain passes and is rapidly warmed by compression. As noted in a previous column, these winds fascinated artist Salvado Dali and believed they… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 26, 2015

Yesterday’s column furthered memories of sled-riding. It was all “down-hill” with a sled, toboggan, aluminum saucer or garbage can lid. Overnight, Nicky Sadano would coat the trail with water, creating an ice layer that increased speed, but perturbed drivers attempting to get up-the-hill. After the big snow it was meltdown time; turning the powder to squishy snow, perfect… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 24, 2015

Miriam Johnson was our piano teacher, and her three worst students were me and my brothers Denis and Michael. As we were more interested in sports than classical music, it was a challenge for Mom to ensure that daily practices were completed. As noted in a previous column, Saturday morning’s lesson began with a mile walk… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 23, 2015

Extreme blizzard conditions where blowing and falling snow reduces visibilities to the point where the sky and the ground appear totally white is a whiteout. New Mexico and portions of Texas experienced these conditions Thursday. One of the fiercest blizzards occurring in the world is the purga or poorga that rolls across northern Siberia. With below zero temperatures,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 21, 2015

An elderly lady from Gonzales left a voice-message believing that her eyes deceived her. She noted, “There’s a rainbow against the Sun!” She continued, “I need to know what this is, I thought that maybe I cracked!” What she experienced Monday was a halo or sundog. Ice crystals in the upper atmosphere act as prisms and when sunlight,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 20, 2015

Mesoscale eddies are spinning bodies of water that grow as large as 500 kilometers in diameter. These eddies can also exist from days to months before being absorbed into surrounding water. Scientists at the University of Hawaii reviewed satellite data from 1992 through 2010. Their research matched the data with floating sensors that identified the eddies by their… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 20, 2015

Mesoscale eddies are spinning bodies of water that grow as large as 500 kilometers in diameter. These eddies can also exist from days to months before being absorbed into surrounding water. Scientists at the University of Hawaii reviewed satellite data from 1992 through 2010. Their research matched the data with floating sensors that identified the eddies by their… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 14, 2015

The Atacama Desert is located in the upper reaches of Chile in South America. The desert extends from the Peruvian border to the town of Copiapo. To the west is the Pacific Ocean and to the east, the high central Andes, spanning 100 miles at its widest section. As noted in a previous column, the yearly precipitation amounts… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 13, 2015

The Aurora Borealis is never witnessed in south Louisiana but is often viewed in northern regions. Also known as Northern Lights, highly charged electrons from solar wind interact with a variety of atmospheric elements, including gas and dust. These particles, at various levels of the atmosphere, create the spectacular colors of the Aurora Borealis. Tonight at the Louisiana… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 12, 2015

Years ago, plane de-icing was randomly performed when conditions warranted and is now a regimented procedure. On this date in 1982, Air Florida Flight 90 crashed into the icy Potomac River, thirty seconds after takeoff from National Airport in Arlington, Virginia. The casualty count noted 78 deaths, including four who were in cars on the 14th… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 11, 2015

Today marks the anniversary of “America’s most fascinating and surreal disaster.” As noted in a previous column, on Jan. 11, 1919, Boston’s Daily Globe reported that “A cold air mass settled in.” The following morning, the mercury tumbled from 36 degrees to 20 at 2 p.m to 7 degrees at 10 p.m.; then 2 degrees. Crews… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 10, 2015

Friday morning offered another example of winter weather preparations. In addition to the household tasks of protecting vegetation, pets and pipes, transportation authorities prepared for episodes of icing and glazing. Referring to pets, during our younger years, an expected blast of Canadian air meant that our “outside” dog, Pooch, was permitted to spend the cold evenings in… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 9, 2015

There could be episodes of blizzards as we advance through the Winter season. “Blizzard” originally meant “a stunning blow,” often referred to a boxer’s knockout punch. Davy Crockett, no relation to Jennifer, used the word in reference to a barrage of rifle shot as a deer to “taking a blizzard” to his prey. As noted in a previous… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 8, 2015

The Department of Defense originated the Heat Advisory Index and the Wind Chill Index. How exposed reacts in high humidity and high heat causes bodily complications. Very cold temperatures and increased wind speeds also create hypothermic complications. Our daytime high today won’t reach 50 degrees and the last time that occurred was on February 11th and 12th, 2014.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 6, 2015

The Heartland Institute’s Mission is to discover, develop, and promote free-market solutions to social and economic problems. The Health Board of Brown County, WI, reviewed research and declared that wind turbines are a “human health hazard.” Local residents report that noise frequency from Duke Energy turbines at the Shirley Wind Farm are causing ear pain, nausea, headaches,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 5, 2015

Tonight’s full moon rises at 6:06 and with clear skies, astronomers will enjoy good viewing. Native Americans referred to this moon as the Full Cold Moon. A full Moon, reflecting off a snow surface, increases “moonlight.” As noted in a previous column, Parade Magazine’s columnist, David Levy, filed an article, “Why We Have A Moon.” Levy took… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 4, 2016

In South Louisiana, car-hopping occurred at Hopper’s or Sonic as “car hops” delivered the burgers, fries and shakes. Car hopping in Pennsylvania occurred after a heavy snow. Our favorite jump-on spot was Pete Pavlovic’s Store. With a half-foot of snow on Brighton Road and without traction, cars would spin across the icy, snow-covered road, struggling to… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Jan. 3, 2015

As noted in a previous column, the Sause boys, Mike and Kit, attended the Ohio State-Michigan blizzard in the 1950s. Thursday’s Sugar Bowl game reminded me of Jan. 1, 2002, when LSU played Illinois. Tiger fans packed the Super Dome on a cloudy, cold day. Rain changed to sleet, then flurries. At the end of the game,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s weather news for Jan. 2, 2015

New Year’s Day “Polar Plunges” are quite common throughout the country. The tradition originated with Pittsburgh’s Gus Brickner in the ‘40s. Gus would head to the banks of the Allegheny River and either dive in or cut through the ice and dive in. Polar Bear Plunges are common on the Jersey Shore, Sandy Point Lake at Annapolis, Maryland,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s weather news for Wednesday, Dec. 31, 2014

On this date in 1907, The New York Times moved its offices to a building on a square that now bears its name. To commemorate the paper’s new home, Publisher Alfred Ochs provided a lavish New Year’s celebration intended to attract parishioners from Trinity Church in lower Manhattan. The church was traditionally the gathering place on New Year’s… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s weather news for Monday, Dec. 29, 2014

Sunday’s column reminisced how icy steps sent a parishioner at St. Agatha’s Church airborne. The robust lady lost her balance on the Church steps, slipped on the ice then spun and swirled across the slick sidewalk, ending up at the feet of my brother Mike and me. For every action there’s an equal and opposite reaction. Our Dad… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s weather news for Sunday, Dec. 28, 2014

It seems that snow adds to the Christmas season. As noted in a previous column, winter weather prompted disciplinary actions of my father. After Mass at St. Agatha’s Church in Ellwood City, PA, Dad would routinely purchase the Youngstown Vindicator or the Pittsburgh Press. This particular Sunday was snowy as sheets of ice coated the sidewalks and church… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 25, 2014

Christmas morning found five kids, a grandfather and parents rushing into a living room that for 20 days was locked and curtained to add to the excitement. “Turns” were taken in opening gifts so others could see them and then it was breakfast time. In addition to juice, eggs and Dad’s homemade sausage, Mom’s “sticky bunds” were a… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 24, 2014

Astrophysicist Grant Matthews believes that April 17, 6 B.C., is the best date for the appearance of the Christmas star. The wise men were Zoroastrian astrologers who would have calculated the planetary alignment in Aries as a sign that a powerful leader was born. It could have also meant that the leader was destined to die at an… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 23, 2014

Monday’s column described Jack Steckman’s gravesite business and Christmas evergreen wreaths placed on graves. Jack saved left-over branches for our Mom. Gramps would retrieve the branches by using a cradle box attached to a sled as this assignment also got Kevin and me out of her hair. A short trip to Steckman’s lasted two hours because Gramps would… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 21, 2014

Welcome to winter. The direction of the wind is a determining factor as to changing weather conditions. In my younger days, our grandfather would ask us to “check that thar weather vane” on top of the house. As noted in a previous column, where many weathervanes on barns and towers included animals, birds and other objects,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 20, 2014

Friday’s column identified the difficulties of Chester Greenwood and his ears. His doctor determined that he and his ears were allergic to wool and very sensitive to cold weather. With some assistance from his grandmother, George solved the problem by looping two pieces of wire with fur sewn to the ends. According to the United States… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 19, 2014

During episodes of cold weather, Chester Greenwood was cursed with throbbing, aching ears. They would change color when the temperature dipped below freezing. His ears would first turn pale white, then vivid red and finally blue. As noted in a previous column, Chester had no trouble doing chores when the weather was above freezing, but once… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 18, 2014

We continue our column from Wednesday with Wilbur and Orville Wright’s designation of Kitty Hawk for their first flight. On Sept. 15, 1903, a Category 2 hurricane hit the Outer Banks with 72 mph winds. When the Wrights arrived at their camp at nearby Kill Devil Hills 10 days later, the shed that housed their glider… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 17, 2014

In 1899, Orville and Wilbur Wright had never heard of Kitty Hawk, N.C. Requesting wind velocities in the Chicago area from the United States Weather Bureau, Professor Willis Moore forwarded copies of the “Monthly Weather Review,” containing average wind speeds from across the country. One station was a small community in the Outer Banks of North Carolina.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 16, 2014

“Gloves or Mittens” Gloves were in use for November and a couple of days in December. Mittens are more effective for hand warming. Exposed body parts such as ears, nose, toes and fingers are vulnerable. Hunters, fishing enthusiasts and golfers may experience “chilbains,” caused by prolonged exposure to cold, damp weather. As noted in a previous column,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 15, 2014

Saturday’s column described “winter count,” by which Native Americans chronicled the winter season. During harsh winters, tribes hibernated and sketched images of battles, deaths of leaders and extreme climate conditions. In 1686, John K. Bear noted, “Ice all over the land.” In 1711 Batiste Good journaled, “Four lodges drowned winter” and Ben Kindle reported in 1773,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 13, 2014

In our younger years, a heavy snowfall sent us outdoors. Neighborhood pine trees offered a traditional winter prank. I would encourage my brother Kevin to stand under the snow laden branches. I would then vigorously shake the branches, unloading 20 pounds on his head. Another “big snow” treat was lying down on the bank of our… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 12, 2014

The Rouse Simmons sank during a winter gale on November 23, 1912. For 30 years the schooner brought Christmas trees from Michigan and Wisconsin to Chicago. As noted in a previous column, it would arrive at Chicago’s docks in early December, decorated with Christmas lights. The public boarded the ship, purchasing balsam, pine trees, garland and wreaths and… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 11, 2014

A look-back” to this date in 2008 found a developing low along the Texas coast, tracking northeast, edging closer to south Louisiana. During the evening hours, the National Weather Service predicted a possible “wintry mix” in our area at daybreak. The Channel 2 weather team was “on-the-fence” as to whether it would be a sleet or snow event.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 8, 2014

When lightning strikes planes, the charges glide from nose to tail or from wing tip to wing tip before discharging. Today, airliners have on-board radar to track storms and wind shear. These technological advances prevent lightning from disrupting an aircraft. As noted in a previous column, over Elkton, Maryland, on December 8, 1963, Pan Am Flight 214 was… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 7, 2014

Our unseasonably warm weather won’t deter families from heading to the country today to cut a tree. Limited space finds some folks hanging a Christmas tree upside down, which could compromise needed water. This practice originated in the 700s. The Little Blue Book for Advent and the Christmas Season notes that St. Boniface, an eighth-century English… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 6, 2014

The coaching change at Michigan prompted recollections of another coaching change in 1950. The game against Ohio State on Nov. 25, 1950, was during the worst snowstorm to hit Ohio since 1913. Mike Sause and his brother Kit attended the game with their dad and brother Bill. Mike noted, “We wore so much clothing we couldn’t… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 5, 2014

The continual warm weather is keeping us in shirts and possibly shorts. It was a limited wardrobe for our grandfather, Bert Price. He wore the same clothing everyday, no matter what the weather. His wardrobe consisted of cotton long johns, heavy socks, flannel shirt, a railroad hat, bib overalls or pants with suspenders and work gloves. He kept… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 4, 2014

The needed rain in California won’t put a dent in their drought. It is wet-weather season there and no season compares to what the state experienced 153 years ago. From December, 1861 to January, 1862, a 30 day event translated to a 30,000 year flood event. Rain was reported in the state on 28 out of 39 days.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 3, 2014

The New York Times reports that large portions of the West Antarctica Ice Sheet is collapsing at an irreversible trend. Scientists report that climate change is once again the culprit. Two studies found that naturally occurring warm water is being advanced upward toward the ice sheet as stronger winds blow into the Antarctica region. This combination is creating… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Dec. 1, 2014

December, 2014 is coming in like a “lamb.” Years ago, snow covered Baton Rouge before our Coats for Kids distribution. Historical events for the end of November and the first days of December include extremely cold weather on November 29, 1831. This event “iced-over” the Northeast, closing New York’s Erie Canal through December. On December 1, 1969,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Nov. 30, 2014

It’s been two weeks since we experienced a thunderstorm event. As we wrap-up our Thanksgiving weekend, we advance to Advent and preparations for Christmas. The “Yule Log” wasn’t just for Christmas. In Germany, the burning of a large block of oak, called a Yule Log, is a time-honored tradition. This tradition predates Christianity and may have some… Continue reading →