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Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 30, 2014

On this date in 2012, New Jersey residents were experiencing the devastation of Superstorm Sandy. In 1991, another storm, referred to as the Halloween Storm, lashed the North Carolina coast for five days. Hurricane-force winds pounded New England and New Jersey causing the highest tides on the Eastern Seaboard since the Great Atlantic Hurricane of ‘44. As noted… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 27, 2014

Sunday’s column noted the origin of the term “threshold.” The origin of this food stuff recognizes a slab of bacon as a sign of a wealthy man who “could really bring home the bacon.” As noted in a previous column, sharing the bacon led to guests “chewing the fat.” The wealthy had plates of pewter while the… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton ‘s Weather News for Oct. 26, 2014

Our daily bath or shower is routine, but that was not the case years ago when the “man of the house” enjoyed the privilege of clean water for his bath. As noted in a previous column, Dad’s “scrub-up” was followed by the other sons, then the women and finally the babies. The dirty water posed a… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 25, 2014

A hoedown is a dance or traditional fiddle tunes. Octobers in high school included the Varsity “R” Hoedown, a fundraiser for the athletic teams that included food, music and cider drinking competitions. One contestant spilled a mug of cider. As my brother Mike cleaned the mess, Bobo Tincani stepped into the cider puddle. Mike told him… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 24, 2014

On Oct. 23, 1947, a cafe in Marksville was suddenly filled with news that fish were falling from the sky. As noted in an archived column, a biologist for the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries provided the following account. “In an 80,000-square-foot area, thousands of freshwater fish, native to local waters, were landing on Main and Monroe… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 22, 2014

Luigi Bombicci, a mineralogist from Bologna, Italy, believed that hail could be prevented. In 1880, his theory of “spherohedron” described the hailstone’s process of crystallization and preventing hail development with sound. In 1896, Albert Steiger, mayor of Windisch-Feistritz, Austria, made the first attempt to defeat hail with the force of sound and did so by using… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 21, 2014

It’s not unusual for those that reside in the northern extremes and the northeast to experience snowfall at this time of the year. The “changing leaves” were somewhat deterred this year as maples and cottonwoods still offer beautiful displays. Also at this time of the year, forecasts may include a “snow loading alert.” This is especially pertinent to… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 20, 2014

In other sections of the United States it is not unusual for a winter weather alert to be issued at this time of the year and many locations are also awaiting their first frost. An extended period of dry, warm days, following a frost,` is common and as noted in a previous column, this describes Indian summer. In… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 19, 2014

Weather anniversaries for Oct. 19 include Hurricane Wilma, blasting the Yucatan with 175 mile-per-hour winds nine years ago. Katrina, Rita, Wilma were among the five most intense Atlantic hurricanes, rewriting the record book in other categories. Wilma’s eye wall was two nautical miles wide, the smallest on record. Louisiana has also experienced episodes of earthquakes. On… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 18, 2014

Previous columns have noted Ben Franklin’s expertise as an inventor, including his lightning experiments. Franklin was inspired by other inventors, especially French academic Thomas Dalibard, who actually performed the first lightning experiment. Franklin wanted to duplicate Dalibard’s experiment and did so from Philadelphia’s Christ Church on Oct. 19, 1752. According to his diary, Franklin made a… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 17, 2014

King John “Lackland,” King Henry’s II’s favorite son, got his nickname because his father had no land to give him. As noted in a previous column, John, the younger brother of King Richard the Lionhearted, tried to overthrow his brother. Returning from the Crusades in 1194, he forgave his brother but John was condemned by barons because of… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 16, 2014

On October 15, 1907, Nicaraguan rebel forces, under the leadership of Gen. Pablo Castilliano, were attempting to overthrow the government. As noted in a previous column, with money, weapons and expertise, government forces were repeatedly beaten by the rebels and on the verge of surrendering. Camped along a ridge overlooking their enemy, the rebels prepared for a final… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 15, 2014

By Oct. 27 the World Series will include either the Giants, Cardinals, Orioles or Royals. After Pearl Harbor in 1941, the Office of Censorship advised radio stations to omit mentions of weather. It was a voluntary “code” as station managers feared compromising their licenses. Newspapers could only publish the previous day’s highs and lows for no… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 14, 2014

After a return to August-like weather a well organized cold front blasted through our state on Monday. Wind damage and investigated reports of tornadoes will be validated today. The destructive nature of this front is also providing a few benefits this week. We’re fortunately sliding out of the upper and mid 80s to temperatures in the mid 70s… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 13, 2014

On October 13, 1917, 70,000 people gathered at Fatima, Portugal, to witness a miracle. They testified that the sun became detached from the sky, rolling right and left as if it were falling upon the earth. Lucia Santos and her two cousins Francisco and Jacinta Marto testified that five months earlier the Virgin Mary appeared to… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 12, 2014

On the heels of Typhoon Phanfone, Vongfong, meaning “the wasp,” will impact Japan. The most intense storm to hit the Pacific Northwest started from the remnants of Typhoon Freda that formed on Oct. 3, 1962. Three successive storms hit the Pacific Northwest over a 30-hour period from Oct. 11-12, 1962. The first postponed the sixth… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 10, 2014

Krypton was bothersome to Superman but is beneficial to scientists. A commonly used method of calculating ancient ice age better understands Earth’s climate and past ice ages. For years, carbon dating compared the decay of a radioactive isotope to that of a stable isotope. Carbon -14 is produced by cosmic rays in the ice, providing dating to 50,000… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 9, 2014

Years ago, kids “missing” school at the start of deer season, in Western Pennsylvania, initiated a “day-off.” Many school districts prevent make-up days by planning for snow events. Schools in Mississippi and Alabama have tornado days in place. The deadly tornado that hit Moore, Oklahoma in 2013, took 24 lives, including nine children. Officials in Oklahoma are continuing… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 8, 2014

Earth Gauge suggests that highs, lows and frontal passages compliment the movement of migratory birds. The best time for bird watchers is the day after a cold front passes providing northerly winds, dropping temperatures, rising air pressure and clearing skies. The website eBird offers tips for viewing migratory birds and weather with weekly regional migration forecasts and tips… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 6, 2014

Mobile food canteens have become popular in the Baton Rouge area and have caused problems in China. Smoke from the barbecue stands are a common source of unhealthy airborne particulate matter known as PM2.5. A spokesman from Beijing’s Bureau of City Administration and Law Enforcement insists the “stands” not only create serious air pollution but enhance noise pollution… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 5, 2014

Saturday’s column reviewed the successful prediction of Stephen Saxby on Oct. 4, 1869. It was called Saxby’s Gale and was based on the position of the moon relative to the Earth. Storm season is underway for the Canadian Maritimes and coastal sections of the northeast. Storms are predicted by the climatology of the region, Saxby’s scenario… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 4, 2014

George Washington carried one, and Mark Twain wrote of a “real Barlow” in “Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn” in 1876. A Barlow is classified as a penknife, however original penknives didn’t have folding blades, resembling a scalpel and designed to thin and point writing instruments known as quills. Both knives were used for whittling which is… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 3, 2014

Our seasonal changes can change our relaxation time to chore time. Tasks include checking the air conditioning units in the spring to keep them humming throughout the summer. Furnace tune-ups prevent problems during the super-cold days. One of the traditions when we were kids was the autumn chore known as “changing out the screens.” Sixteen windows… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 2, 2014

With 59 days left in Hurricane Season 2014, historically, October was a vulnerable month for destructive tropical systems. Hurricane Hilda on October 3, 1964 killed 16 Louisiana residents and after moving inland, tornadoes killed 22 more in LaRose. In 1999, October hurricanes: Mitch, Joyce, Keith, and Irene caused extensive damage. Opal came on the heels of Elena causing… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Oct. 1, 2014

Weed pulling is a year-round chore in South Louisiana. “The vine that ate the South” is the kudzu plant, native to Asia and introduced to the United States in the 19th century. As noted in a previous column, the vine was classified as a pest weed by the Department of Agriculture 50 years ago. In addition… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 30, 2014

Years ago, manual weather readings were conducted at the Baton Rouge Weather Service Office. This exercise constituted data collection from instrumentation and other observations. For the last 118 years, an observer has recorded daily temperature readings and observations at a remote location and nature area, 90 miles north of New York City. The Montauk Preserve weather station… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton Weather News for Sept. 28, 2014

The apple harvest is underway in northern orchards. Our backyard provided a good crop for everyone. Mom secured enough produce to “put up” apple sauce, apple butter and freezer apples for pies and cobblers. To complement refrigeration a basement or spring house provided a “climate-controlled” environment for turnips, potatoes, carrots, peaches and apples. Another location… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 27, 2014

George Washington carried one, and Mark Twain wrote of a “real Barlow” in “Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn” in 1876. A Barlow is classified as a penknife, however original penknives didn’t have folding blades. It resembled a scalpel and was designed to thin and point writing instruments known as quills. Both knives were used for whittling,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 26, 2014

In response to yesterday’s column, a reader questioned the lack of acorns on her street and sidewalk as compared to four years ago. The amount of nuts on the ground then could have been attributed to Hurricane Isaac. There appears to be evidence that additional acorns may identify an approaching cold season. During my exercise run,… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 24, 2014

On the morning of Saturday, Sept. 24, 2005 at 2:38, Hurricane Rita made landfall at Johnson’s Bayou in Cameron Parish. The Category Three Hurricane posted winds that made it the fourth most intense Atlantic hurricane. Rita followed Katrina, causing damage in two cities on each end of our state. My column from September 23, 2005 noted, “For the… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 23, 2014

Now that it’s Autumn, folks in the Northeast will enjoy the changing-of-the-leaves. Each leaf contains anthocyanins that act like a sunscreen and once the chlorophyll breaks down, photosynthesis slows This process retards the absorption of light and excess light damages the leaves. Researchers determined that nutrient-poor leaves, low in nitrogen, causes the intense red color of sugar maple… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 22, 2014

At 9:29 tonight, the Sun slides across the equator, initiating the autumnal equinox. Before the designation of seasons, cultures recognized seasons as either rainy or dry. Others recognized them as growing, harvesting and winter, while others have marked ten or more seasons. The designation of four seasons has a definitive beginning and end with key moments when the… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 20, 2014

Recent wet weather has slightly delayed our sugarcane harvest. The purchase of the “deep-freezer” by my dad in the 1960s became a storage locker for the fruits and vegetables from our garden in Ellwood City, Pa. As noted in a previous column, fruit trees included apple, pear, peach, plum and a grape arbor, producing enough fruit… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 19, 2014

Thursday’s column identified China as the most dammed country. Another dam builder is the beaver. Their dams, canals and lodges protect them from predators, provide a food source and building materials. When startled, beavers initiate an alarm on their quiet pools by energetically smacking the water with their broad tail; forwarding a danger message to others. Stockpiled sticks… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 18, 2014

China was the first to be named in 2007 and still leads that list as the most dammed nation in the world. The United States is second, followed by India, japan, Spain and Canada. In 140 countries, 47, 665 large dams exist. Scientists believe that the weight of their water alters the speed of the Earth’s rotation.… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 17, 2014

On Sept. 16, 2010, Hurricanes Igor and Julia made it to Category 4 status. This marked the first time since September 16, 1926 that two Category 4 hurricanes existed in the Atlantic at the same time for just six hours. September 16, 1999 marked a day of unprecedented devastation for North Carolina. Hurricane Floyd unloaded 20 inches of… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 16, 2014

The Gulf water temperature is at its highest, conducive for tropical storm development. Researchers at the University of Miami have joined forces to achieve dual goals. Atmospheric scientists and marine biologists are predicting the severity of tropical storms and evaluating fish migration. Since 2001, one team has been tagging large pelagic fish such as tarpon, with satellite linked… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 13, 2014

This morning’s column looks back to 2005. Catholics recognized the birth of the Blessed Mother this past week. At noon mass on Sept. 7, 2005, Father Vic Messina delivered his homily duirng Hurricane Katrina’s aftermath. He referenced The Cathedral of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Biloxi and the foresight of its builders. It was… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 12, 2014

A refreshment expert recently suggested that climate change may be impacting popular refreshments. Extreme weather affects Coco-Cola’s supply of sugar cane, sugar beets and citrus fruits. On a related note, Nike shuttered factories in Thailand due to flooding. The New York Times reports that Jeffrey Seabright, Vice-President for environment and water resources for Coke, referenced events related to… Continue reading →

Needed water could be rationed

The current drought in the west took many by surprise and has now revealed the inadequacies of programs designed to distribute Colorado River water. The New York Times reports that this drought is now into its second decade and has shrunk the river and the reservoirs it feeds. Last June, officials cut back on water flowing from Lake… Continue reading →

The casket, the storm...

Sunday’s column noted the story of actor Charles Coughlin who died in 1899 during a performance in Galveston. Before his death a fortune teller forewarned of his demise in a southern city at the height of his career. As noted in a previous column, immediately after his burial the Hurricane of 1899 hit Galveston, sending his casket into… Continue reading →

A casket for openers

Bagpiper, casket and vault peddler, Banjo Bob Cargo, noted that if I post this story, free bagpipe lessons. In 1899, classical actor Charles Coughlin, from Prince Edward Island, Canada, relocated to Galveston, against his family’s wishes. Before pursuing his career he consulted a fortune teller, forewarning that he would die at the height of his fame in a… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 6, 2014

Autumn begins in 16 days, the traditional launch of “The Farmer’s Almanac.” I’ve noted its predictions in recent columns. Robert B. Thomas started “The Old Farmer’s Almanac.” In 1818, David Young began this almanac by extrapolating a combination of lunar cycles, planet positions and sunspot maximums to create a weather formula for sections of the United States. Clothed… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 5, 2014

Thursday’s column reviewed the accuracy of the Farmer’s Almanac. The Almanac’s predictions for 2015 predict wetter-than-normal conditions for the Gulf Coast and Florida. Cold and unsettled weather is expected for November and December. Florida and the Carolinas will be “in the crosshairs” for tropical storms in late July with another threat for Florida in late August and the… Continue reading →

Pat Shingleton’s Weather News for Sept. 4, 2014

Video coverage of tropical storms, hurricanes and damaging thunderstorms include the swinging and swaying of traffic lights. Hurricane video also offers swinging stoplights, dangling and crashing from the hurricane’s force. Wire and cable connected street lights are a thing-of-the-past in Baton Rouge. In the 1980s, Miami was the first city to install “Mast Arms.” When eight hurricanes hit… Continue reading →